CNN

Sen Elizabeth Warren escalates Facebook ad feud

A days-long feud between Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Facebook intensified over the weekend as she openly accused the company of "taking money to promote lies." Facebook fired back via another social media platform, Twitter, where the company compared itself to broadcast television stations that ran a Trump ad and are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission. The "FCC doesn't want broadcast companies censoring candidates' speech," Facebook said.

President Trump turns up the volume with days of anti-media attacks

President Donald Trump has made a "war" on the press a central part of his presidency. In the past few days, it feels as if he's turned up the volume another notch. Destroying any notion of a shared truth — pressuring people not to believe real reporting — that's the Trump era story in one sentence. "There has never been a time in the history of our Country that the Media was so Fraudulent, Fake, or Corrupt!" President Trump wrote. When his presidency is "looked back on," he said, he hopes that a "big part" of his legacy will be "the exposing of massive dishonesty" in the press.

Federal officials raise concerns about White House plan to police alleged social media censorship

Officials from the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission have expressed serious concerns about a draft Trump administration executive order seeking to regulate tech giants, according to several people familiar with the matter. In a closed-door meeting in July, officials from the two agencies met to discuss the matter with a Commerce Department office that advises the White House on telecommunications, the people said. A key issue raised in the meeting was the possibility the Trump administration's plan may be unconstitutional, one of the people said.

White House proposal would have FCC and FTC police alleged social media censorship

Apparently, a draft executive order from the White House could put the Federal Communications Commission in charge of shaping how Facebook, Twitter, and other large tech companies curate what appears on their websites. A summary of the draft order calls for the FCC to develop new regulations clarifying how and when the law protects social media websites when they decide to remove or suppress content on their platforms.