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Since 1996, the Benton Foundation has provided free, daily summaries of articles concerning the quickly-changing telecommunications policy landscape. Since September 2005, we've used individual stories to help track developments in telecommunications legislation, the media ownership debate and efforts to ensure universal broadband.

Headlines

Benton Foundation provides free, daily summaries of articles concerning the quickly-changing telecommunications policy landscape.

The Feds Have to Act to Get America Faster Wi-Fi

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

The federal government just needs to pave the way for the next generation of Wi-Fi. More than ever before, consumers are using technologies that rely on “unlicensed spectrum”—that is, public airwaves that the government hasn’t licensed exclusively to a particular company or person—to access the Internet and connect their devices. But here’s the problem. Unlicensed spectrum is becoming a victim of its own success.

Is Wi-Fi in Danger?

Location:
Fletcher, Heald and Hildreth, 1300 North 17th St, Arlington, VA, 22209, United States
Recommendation:
2

Wi-Fi may be one of the best ideas anybody ever had. When the technology was still expensive, 20 years ago, its main application was connecting servers to computers in the workplace and to cash registers in large retail stores.

How to Deal with Data Caps, Sponsored Data and Zero-Rating

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
2

The FCC’s rulings are in effect as the case wends its way through the courts, but wired and wireless broadband providers like Comcast, T-Mobile, AT&T and Verizon are taking advantage of the waiting period to test a series of new pricing and data schemes that harm Internet users and rightfully worry Network Neutrality proponents.

Lessons Learned from the US Unbundling Experience

Location:
Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal & Economic Public Policy Studi, Washington, DC, 20015, United States
Recommendation:
2

Without passing any judgment on the consumer welfare benefits of unbundling or its failure, we attempt to discern what happened in order to see if there are any lessons that can be learned from the experience.

Mark Zuckerberg says Free Basics shutdown won’t keep Internet.org out of India

Location:
Facebook (new HQ), 1601 Willow Road, Menlo Park, CA, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India effectively banned Facebook's Free Basics program from the country, ruling that the system and others like it violate the principles of network neutrality. It's a big setback for Facebook's Internet.org program, which looks to provide basic connectivity to poor nations — but in a post Feb 8, Mark Zuckerberg said the ruling would not push Internet.org out of India entirely.

Statement of NTIA Head Strickling on 20th Anniversary of the Telecommunications Act of 1996

Location:
National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), 1401 Constitution Ave, Washington, DC, 20230, United States
Recommendation:
2

Twenty years ago today President Clinton signed the 1996 Telecommunications Act into law, removing regulatory barriers for our nation’s communications companies and fueling investment in broadband networks.

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Benton Foundation provides free, daily summaries of articles concerning the quickly-changing telecommunications policy landscape.

The Feds Have to Act to Get America Faster Wi-Fi

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

The federal government just needs to pave the way for the next generation of Wi-Fi. More than ever before, consumers are using technologies that rely on “unlicensed spectrum”—that is, public airwaves that the government hasn’t licensed exclusively to a particular company or person—to access the Internet and connect their devices. But here’s the problem. Unlicensed spectrum is becoming a victim of its own success.

Is Wi-Fi in Danger?

Location:
Fletcher, Heald and Hildreth, 1300 North 17th St, Arlington, VA, 22209, United States
Recommendation:
2

Wi-Fi may be one of the best ideas anybody ever had. When the technology was still expensive, 20 years ago, its main application was connecting servers to computers in the workplace and to cash registers in large retail stores.

How to Deal with Data Caps, Sponsored Data and Zero-Rating

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
2

The FCC’s rulings are in effect as the case wends its way through the courts, but wired and wireless broadband providers like Comcast, T-Mobile, AT&T and Verizon are taking advantage of the waiting period to test a series of new pricing and data schemes that harm Internet users and rightfully worry Network Neutrality proponents.

Lessons Learned from the US Unbundling Experience

Location:
Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal & Economic Public Policy Studi, Washington, DC, 20015, United States
Recommendation:
2

Without passing any judgment on the consumer welfare benefits of unbundling or its failure, we attempt to discern what happened in order to see if there are any lessons that can be learned from the experience.

Mark Zuckerberg says Free Basics shutdown won’t keep Internet.org out of India

Location:
Facebook (new HQ), 1601 Willow Road, Menlo Park, CA, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India effectively banned Facebook's Free Basics program from the country, ruling that the system and others like it violate the principles of network neutrality. It's a big setback for Facebook's Internet.org program, which looks to provide basic connectivity to poor nations — but in a post Feb 8, Mark Zuckerberg said the ruling would not push Internet.org out of India entirely.

Statement of NTIA Head Strickling on 20th Anniversary of the Telecommunications Act of 1996

Location:
National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), 1401 Constitution Ave, Washington, DC, 20230, United States
Recommendation:
2

Twenty years ago today President Clinton signed the 1996 Telecommunications Act into law, removing regulatory barriers for our nation’s communications companies and fueling investment in broadband networks.

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