The Future of Global Digital Governance

New America

Tuesday, November 29, 2022 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
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The digital domain is fast emerging as a new landscape of global competition and conflict. The benefits of digitization have been immense, but so have the harms -- rampant disinformation, privacy violations, cyberattacks, and the worsening of inequalities, to name a few. As harms proliferate and the technology rapidly broaches new frontiers of complexity and power, such as in AI and quantum computing, tensions over security, access, innovation, and human rights are becoming more pronounced, and the stakes are rising.

It’s clear we need greater global stewardship to ensure digital technology promotes human rights, inclusive sustainable development, and international stability. But the world has yet to develop global frameworks to govern the digital domain. Different nations have competing visions of whose interests should take precedence – whether those of the state (as in China), the firm (the US), or the end-user (the EU). But what principles and mechanisms should underwrite global tech governance? Who should write the rules? And how?

Join us for this panel discussion on the future of global digital governance in-person at Princeton University or watch the livestream.

Panelists:

  • Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO New America and Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs Princeton University
  • Andres Monroy-Hernandez, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Director Human-Computer Interaction Lab Princeton University
  • Monica Greco, Senior Program Officer Open Society Foundations
  • Ed Felten, Robert E. Khan Professor Emeritus of Computer Science and Public Affairs and Founding Director Center for Information Technology Policy Princeton University

Moderator:

  • Candace Rondeaux, Director Planetary Politics Initiative New America

Opening Remarks:

  • Amaney Jamal, Dean Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Politics Princeton University