Upcoming event

The Future Openness of the Internet Should Not Turn on the Decision of a Particular Company

On Tuesday, April 17, the House Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology will hold a hearing –  entitled “From

Sponsor: 

Federal Communications Commission

Date: 
Fri, 03/15/2019 - 10:30 to 12:30

Topics selected for FCC open meeting agendas will be posted on the Commission's website approximately three weeks prior to the Commission's next monthly meeting. The Commission will also issue a public notice of the "Commission Meeting Agenda" one week before the meeting and announce at that time the items that are scheduled for the agenda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Sponsor: 

Federal Communications Commission

Date: 
Thu, 02/21/2019 - 10:30 to 12:30

Topics selected for FCC open meeting agendas will be posted on the Commission's website approximately three weeks prior to the Commission's next monthly meeting. The Commission will also issue a public notice of the "Commission Meeting Agenda" one week before the meeting and announce at that time the items that are scheduled for the agenda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Sponsor: 

Federal Communications Commission

Date: 
Wed, 01/30/2019 - 10:30 to 12:30

Topics selected for FCC open meeting agendas will be posted on the Commission's website approximately three weeks prior to the Commission's next monthly meeting. The Commission will also issue a public notice of the "Commission Meeting Agenda" one week before the meeting and announce at that time the items that are scheduled for the agenda.



Sponsor: 

Economic Policy Institute and the Roosevelt Institute ​

Date: 
Mon, 12/17/2018 - 12:30

Sprint and T-Mobile have announced plans to merge, which would significantly increase concentration in the wireless industry—reducing the number of major wireless carriers from four to three, increasing prices for consumers, and lowering wages for workers.

A discussion of groundbreaking new research quantifying the impact of the proposed merger on the wages of retail workers in the wireless industry.

This event is free and open to the public, and lunch will be provided. Your RSVP will help us prepare.

This event will be livestreamed.



Sponsor: 

Federal Communications Bar Association

Date: 
Tue, 12/18/2018 - 12:00 to 14:15

12:00 – 12:05 p.m.     Welcome and Introductions

12:05 – 1:05 p.m.       Eliminating Access Arbitrage–What’s at Stake and What Should the FCC Do?



Sponsor: 

Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy, and Consumer Rights

Senate Judiciary Committee

Date: 
Wed, 12/19/2018 - 14:30

Witnesses

  1. The Honorable William E. Kovacic

    Global Competition Professor Of Law And Policy

    George Washington University Law School

    Washington , DC

  2. Mr. Geoffrey A. Manne

    President And Founder

    International Center for Law and Economics

    Portland , OR

  3. Professor Abbott (Tad) B. Lipsky

    Adjunct Professor Of Law And Director Of Competition Advocacy

    Global Antitrust Institute at Scalia Law School at George Mason University

    Arlington , VA



Sponsor: 

Federal Communications Commission

Date: 
Mon, 01/14/2019 - 10:00 to 16:00

The FCC’s Technological Advisory Council, comprised of a diverse group of leading technology experts, provides technical expertise to the Commission to identify important areas of innovation and develop informed technology policies supporting the United States’ competitiveness in the global economy. The TAC is helping the Commission to continue the momentum spurred by the National Broadband Plan to maximize the use of broadband to advance national interests and create jobs.



Sponsor: 

Cato Institute

Date: 
Fri, 12/14/2018 - 09:00 to 17:30

Join the Cato Institute—and an array of top experts, technologists, and policymakers—for a probing examination of these issues and many more as we seek to navigate the wilderness.



Sponsor: 

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Date: 
Wed, 12/12/2018 - 10:00 to 11:30

For nearly half a century, leaders of the technology industry have been seen as visionary, passionate, and committed to building a better, smarter world. But public perceptions today are shifting—at least, elite opinion is—and the tech industry is suddenly on the defensive when it comes to issues ranging from data privacy to income equity, workplace diversity, antitrust enforcement, cultural biases, regulation, and more. To what extent are these criticisms fair or overblown? Is this just a passing phase, or a sign of a more fundamental shift?