Lobbying

2018: A Turning Point for "Big Tech"

Earlier this month we examined how partisan division at the Federal Communications Commission impedes progress towards closing the digital divide.

How Facebook Avoids Accountability

On Nov 14, the New York Times detailed Facebook’s multi-pronged campaign to “delay, deny and deflect” efforts to hold the company accountable.

Allegations of improprieties related to the Commission's review of the merger between Sinclair and Tribune

In response to requests from Congress made on November 13 and November 15. 20!

AT&T Chief Says Hiring Michael Cohen as Consultant a ‘Big Mistake’

Randall L. Stephenson, AT&T’s chief executive, said in a staffwide memo  that the company had made a “big mistake” by hiring President Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

The Silence of the Bought

[Commentary] The big Internet service provider gate-keepers may have bought the silence of Congress, but they cannot buy the silence of the people.

FCC's Inspector General Looks Into Changes That Benefited Sinclair

In April 2017, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, led the charge for his agency to approve rules allowing television broadcasters to greatly increase the number of stations they own.

Sprint Withdraws From INCOMPAS

Sprint is withdrawing from tech and telecom trade group Incompas, of which Sprint is a founding member after Incompas publicly came out against the company’s proposed merger with T-Mobile.

Inside the lobbying war over California’s landmark privacy law

A landmark law adopted in California in 2018 to rein in the data-collection practices of Facebook, Google and other tech giants has touched off a lobbying blitz that could water it down, potentially undermining new protections that might apply to

T-Mobile gains a powerful ally hiring a former FCC commissioner to ‘advise’ on its Sprint merger

At a time of dysfunction in Washington, there’s at least one thing in this town that still runs like butter: The revolving door.

Data Broker That Sold Phone Locations Used by Bounty Hunters Lobbied FCC to Scrap User Consent

Earlier in Jan it was reported how T-Mobile, AT&T, and Sprint were selling cell phone users’ location data that ultimately ended up in the hands of bounty hunters and people unauthorized to handle it.