Diversity

The Federal Communications Commission has considered four aspects of diversity: 1) Viewpoint diversity ensures that the public has access to a wide range of diverse and antagonistic opinions and interpretations provided by opportunities for varied groups, entities and individuals to participate in the different phases of the broadcast industry; 2) Outlet diversity is the control of media outlets by a variety of independent owners; 3) Source diversity ensures that the public has access to information and programming from multiple content providers; and 4) Program diversity refers to a variety of programming formats and content.

Bending the Arc Towards Media and Social Justice

I’ve spent just over 30 years working to ensure that all Americans benefit from accessible, affordable, and open communications networks that promote democratic values.

Inclusion and Civic Engagement in Public Technology Building and Planning

Whether they are Wi-Fi kiosks, urban sensors, fiber networks, or built-from-scratch “smart” ne

For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist. To Rise Above Our Past, We Must Acknowledge It

[Editorial] When we decided to devote our April 2018 magazine to the topic of race, we thought we should examine our own history before turning our reportorial gaze to others. Race is not a biological construct, as writer Elizabeth Kolbert explain

FCC's Lifeline overhaul sets fire to a bridge over the digital divide

[Commentary] The Federal Communications Commission took its first major step toward overhauling the controversial Lifeline program in a move that will punish not just low-income citizens but perhaps small, innovative service providers as well.  Ye

FCC Moves to Transform Lifeline Program for Low-Income Americans

The Federal Communications Commission took steps to transform its Lifeline program. A Fourth Report and Order, Order on Reconsideration, and Memorandum Opinion and Order changes FCC rules to:

Sponsor: 

Washington College of Law

American University

Date: 
Mon, 10/15/2018 - 23:59

The Fourth National People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference will explore how we, as people of color and allies, preserve and safeguard democracy in our teaching and scholarship, particularly with respect to marginalized communities. The Conference theme is intentionally broad and relates to critical conversations such as: the role of lawyers and law professors; intersectionality, inclusion, and action; and whether and how to reframe and reclaim particular narratives.



Sponsor: 

National Hispanic Media Coalition

Date: 
Fri, 10/12/2018 - 10:00 to 11:15

This event will put a spotlight on Latinx from across the country who are generating innovative connectivity solutions and using technology for social change. Panelists will include:

  • Jessica Rosenworcel, FCC Commissioner

  • Roxanna Barboza, NHMC Policy Fellow

  • Teresa Basilio, Resilient Just Technologies

  • Edwin Reed-Sanchez, SayCel

  • Yamil Lora, THE POINT 

  • Naysia Valdez, Detroit Community Technology Project



Tech Was Supposed to Be Society’s Great Equalizer. What Happened?

In the latest episode of the podcast Crazy/Genius, we ask why the dream of the digital revolution has proven so disappointing for some of its early advocates.

Groups Ask Court to Reject Part of FCC Incubator Program

The Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council (MMTC) and the National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters (NABOB) are challenging the Federal Communications Commission's proposed incubator program, petitioning the US Court of Appeals f

Race, Ethnicity, and Communications Policy Debates: Making the Case for Critical Race Frameworks in Communications Policy

In our working paper, we discuss how civil rights and minority-focused advocacy groups have engaged – or circumvented – Internet policy issues to better serve the communication and technology needs of their underrepresented constituents.