Network Neutrality

Battle for network neutrality isn't over

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

If you thought the fight over net neutrality ended when the Federal Communications Commission issued its strong new "Open Internet" rules, think again.

Net Neutrality Again Puts FCC General Counsel at Center Stage

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
1

In his two years as the Federal Communications Commission’s general counsel, Jonathan Sallet has taken center stage in some of the most divisive debates in Washington.

India blocks Facebook Free Basics internet scheme

Location:
Telecoms Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI), Jawaharlal Nehru Marg, New Delhi, 110 002, India
Recommendation:
4

India's telecoms regulator has blocked Facebook's Free Basics internet service as part of a ruling in favour of network neutrality.

Verizon just blatantly betrayed net neutrality by excluding its video app from data caps

Location:
Verizon Communications, 140 West St, New York, NY, 10007, United States
Recommendation:
3

The Federal Communications Commission's network neutrality rules, passed in 2015, explicitly ban Internet providers from a number of discriminatory measures like throttling and blocking, but there's evidently a huge loophole that every major wireless carrier in the US has rushed to exploit.

T-Mobile to FCC: 'Tread lightly'

Location:
New America, 740 15th Street NW Suite 900, Washington, DC, 20005, United States
Recommendation:
2

T-Mobile is calling on the Federal Communications Commission to "tread lightly" as the agency looks into a series of video offerings that have raised network neutrality concerns among advocates.

It's the Internet, Stupid

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
2

The good news is that presidential candidates are starting to talk about Internet issues. The bad news is that presidential candidates are starting to talk about Internet issues.

How India Pierced Facebook’s Free Internet Program

Location:
India, India
Recommendation:
2

If you wanted to get a glimpse of how hard Facebook can fight when pressed against the wall — a hint of its war chest, the scope of its ambition to access and connect the developing world — take a drive around Mumbai, India’s financial capital, as 2015 turned into 2016.

India, Egypt say no thanks to free Internet from Facebook

Location:
India, India
Recommendation:
2.5

Mark Zuckerberg launched his sweeping Internet.org initiative in 2013 as a way to provide 4 billion people in the developing world with Web access, which he says he sees as a basic human right. But the initiative has hit a major snag in India, where in recent months Free Basics has been embroiled in controversy — with critics saying that the app, which provides limited access to the Web, does a disservice to the poor and violates the principles of “net neutrality,” which holds that equal access to the Internet should be unfettered to all.

Stanford study: T-Mobile's Binge On is 'likely illegal'

Location:
Stanford University, 471 Lagunita Drive Dinkelspiel Auditorium, Stanford, CA, United States
Recommendation:
3

The debate over the potential harm of T-Mobile's Binge On continues, with a new study from Stanford University claiming that the perk violates key network neutrality principles and is "likely illegal."

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There’s No Debating It: Broadband’s Shaky Progress; Cruz’s Title II Misinformation; and Freeing the Set-Top Box

The Jan 8 edition of the Round-up, “Broadband Research and Digital Inclusion” discussed the Federal Communications Commission’s 2016 Broadband Report, which was adopted (but not released) at the FCC's Open Meeting on Jan 28. The FCC’s 2016 Broadband Progress Report concludes that broadband is not being deployed to all Americans in a reasonable and timely fashion.
Presidential candidate Sen Ted Cruz (R-TX), during a campaign stop in New Hampshire, blasted the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Order and the decision to regulate broadband networks under Title II of the Communications Act.
The ongoing battle between presidential candidate Donald Trump and Fox News heated up again this week.
Chairman Wheeler proposed Set-Top Box rules.

Since When Is Free Web Access a Bad Thing?

Location:
International Center for Law and Economics, Portland, OR, United States
Recommendation:
2

Internet content and service providers are poised to offer an economically and socially transformative service to millions of people in developing countries: low-cost access to the Web. That is, if regulators and self-proclaimed consumer advocates don’t stop them.

Regulation by narrative, Part I: How to turn the Internet into a monopoly

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

Former Federal Communications Commission Chief Economist Tim Brennan called the agency’s 2015 Open Internet Order an “economics free zone.” That was a nice way of saying the new regulations were driven by a narrative, not by real analysis.

The internet bundle is already here... and it's a bot

Recommendation:
2

Google, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook have defended net neutrality and fought the bundle. But, deep inside the software that powers their empires, they're each creating a different kind of bundle.

Here’s How Free Basics Is Actually Being Sold Around The World

Location:
Facebook (new HQ), 1601 Willow Road, Menlo Park, CA, United States
Recommendation:
2

A BuzzFeed News survey of mobile operators around the globe — the companies that actually implement Free Basics — found that in several markets local telecoms largely see Free Basics as a way to give themselves an edge over competitors. While the grand idea might be an initiative to get people online for the first time, these telecoms view and market Free Basics as an alluring offering for digitally savvy but cash-strapped consumers.

Three myths about zero rating

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
1

The State of the Net’s panel on zero rating featured an interesting debate and real-world insights from Facebook and the Wikimedia Foundation. However, some fallacious arguments regarding zero rating emerged in the discussion which need to be addressed.

Truth-Testing Ted Cruz’s Latest Net Neutrality Comments

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
2

During a campaign stop in New Hampshire, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) slammed the Federal Communications Commission’s 2015 decision to protect the open Internet. His comments were captured in a video now being circulated by Protect Internet Freedom, an anti-Net Neutrality Astroturf group made up of GOP public relations staffers. The question itself fails the truth test. And Cruz’s response is so full of whoppers that it has to be taken apart, sentence by sentence, to fully demonstrate the depth of his dishonesty.

Cyberspace policy at home and abroad: The agenda for 2016 and beyond

Jan 28 2016 - 9:00am - 1:00pm
Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street Twelfth Floor , Washington, DC, 20036, United States

As we kick off 2016, a variety of important cyberpolicy issues are vying for attention. Will this be the year we finally put the net neutrality debate behind us? Will the Federal Communications Commission’s spectrum incentive auction be a success? What will 2016 hold for cybersecurity, online freedom, and Internet governance? And what other global and domestic Internet policy issues should be at the top of the agenda in 2016 and beyond? Join AEI for a keynote with Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Chairman Ron Johnson (R-WI) on the coming year in cybersecurity. AEI and outside scholars will also discuss what lies ahead for domestic and international cyberspace policy in 2016.

For the FCC, competition by any other name

Location:
Georgetown University, 37th and O Streets NW, Washington, DC, 20057, United States
Recommendation:
3

As we enter 2016, competition policy affecting the telecommunication, media and technology (TMT) sector is both inchoate and inconsistent.

'Poor internet for poor people': India's activists fight Facebook connection plan

Location:
Burbank, CA, United States
Recommendation:
3

India is having its Internet uprising, and many western activists can’t figure out what to do about it. Since the spring of 2015, Indian activists have built ferocious momentum against Facebook’s bid to take charge of the nation’s Internet through a program called Free Basics.

Sen Cruz talks Title II on the campaign trail

Location:
NH, United States
Recommendation:
2

Sen Ted Cruz (R-TX) blasted the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to regulate broadband networks in a new campaign trail video released by Protect Internet Freedom, a conservative group fighting the agency’s network neutrality rules.

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Internet Privacy, FreeBee, and the Public Cloud

More than 50 digital rights and consumer groups, including the Benton Foundation, put pressure on the Federal Communications Commission to start drafting Internet privacy rules “as quickly as possible.” The Federal Communications Commission recently had “productive” discussions with Comcast and T-Mobile about whether their offerings of data cap exemptions conflict with the goals of network neutrality. Microsoft pledged to donate $1 billion in cloud services to nonprofits and university researchers over the next three years, as the company updates its philanthropic initiatives to reflect shifts in technology.

The hypocrisy of the anti-paid prioritization movement

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
1

In the network neutrality debate, much has been made about the “problem” of paid prioritization — where an ISP agrees to prioritize traffic from one source over another as part of a commercial exchange. Net neutrality advocates argue that paid prioritization violates the sacred rule of the Internet: that all bits should be treated equally. Yet few of these advocates have acknowledged the hypocrisy of arguing against paid prioritization among content providers without voicing the smallest of concerns about the same business model on the consumer end.

Zero-Rating and Net Neutrality: When is 'Free' Content Good for Users?

Feb 4 2016 - 12:00pm - 1:45pm
Location:
New America, 740 15th Street NW Suite 900, Washington, DC, 20005, United States

Join us for an explanation and debate about zero-rating on mobile networks, featuring the companies most visibly marketing the practice, as well as perspectives from consumer and public interest advocates.

FCC, May I Please Innovate?

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

Despite the once-unimaginable benefits of our tech economy, the future of innovation in America is being threatened by the federal government’s desire for ever-expanding control and regulation. Outrageously, recent decisions, especially at the Federal Communications Commission, are threatening the “permissionless innovation” culture that fostered a digital revolution and created hundreds of thousands new high paying American jobs.

For broadband 'zero rating,' it doesn't have to be all or nothing

Location:
Technology Policy Institute, 1401 Eye NW, Washington, DC, 20005, United States
Recommendation:
2

"I don't always complain about companies giving things away for free. But when I do, it's when they give free stuff to poor people." That might be how Dos Equis beer's "Most Interesting Man in the World" would sum up the opposition to so-called "zero rating" — where content from selected websites does not count against data caps on a subscriber's (typically wireless) broadband plan.

Net neutrality’s next frontier: Usage-based pricing and zero-rating

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

As the Federal Communications Commission begins to gather information about innovative new broadband models such as T-Mobile’s Music Freedom and Binge On offerings, we run the risk of the commission sacrificing consumer choice in order to safeguard the interests of Internet-based service providers.

Does Verizon's FreeBee Sponsored Data Program Thrash Net Neutrality?

Location:
Verizon Communications, 140 West St, New York, NY, 10007, United States
Recommendation:
3

Verizon has jumped into the recent network neutrality controversy with its own program, FreeBee Data, which exempts certain content from monthly data caps. But there is a big difference between FreeBee and T-Mobile's Binge On.

Despite battling for net neutrality, Netflix sees no problem with T-Mobile’s Binge On

Location:
Netflix, 100 Winchester Cir., Los Gatos, CA, 95032, United States
Recommendation:
2

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings says he doesn’t have a problem with T-Mobile’s controversial Binge On service — in fact, Netflix is actually a fan of it.

Facebook’s Regulatory Battle Over Free Basics in India Is Getting Feisty

Location:
Telecoms Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI), Jawaharlal Nehru Marg, New Delhi, 110 002, India
Recommendation:
2

Facebook’s battle with Indian regulators is turning into a public ‘he said, she said’ debate as the two sides continue to fight over Facebook’s Free Basics app, the social network’s effort to bring free Internet services — including Facebook — to emerging markets.

In Growing Spat, Facebook Claims India Telecom Regulator Blocked Its E-mails

Location:
Facebook (new HQ), 1601 Willow Road, Menlo Park, CA, United States
Recommendation:
2

Facebook and the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India, or TRAI, are engaged in a snippy epistolary argument as the agency prepares to write new policy that would affect Free Basics, Facebook’s discounted Internet offering. Now, in the manner of a passive-aggressive spat between roommates, Facebook has accused the agency—or at least, someone within the agency—of blocking its e-mails.

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