Network Neutrality

EU Network Neutrality Guideline Debate Draws Crowd

Location:
European Union, Brussels, Belgium
Recommendation:
3

It wasn't quite the four million comments the Federal Communications Commission received on its Open Internet proceeding, but according to the Save the Internet coalition, which was also a part of that FCC comment flood, more than 500,000 people weighed in on the European Union's proposed guidelines via the coalition's and other websites.

After Net Neutrality

Location:
Annenberg School for Communication - University of Pennsylvania, 3620 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States
Recommendation:
3

Confronting the structural roots of internet monopoly power will require the same commitment to democratic principles and the same activism that won net neutrality.

T-Mobile’s Zero-Rating of Pokémon GO Raises Questions for the Open Internet

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

Beginning July 19, T-Mobile is offering a limited-time promotion tied to the wildly popular augmented reality game Pokémon GO, in which the mobile data used by the game will not count toward a customer’s data cap. This is yet another form of zero-rating, a practice that can raise serious concerns about competition policy, network neutrality, and consumer choice.

GOP: President Obama is Biggest Threat to Internet Survival

Location:
2016 Republican National Convention, 1 Center Ct Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland, OH, 44115, United States
Recommendation:
3

Forget cybercriminals and rogue states: President Barack Obama is the biggest threat to a free and open Internet, at least according to the platform approved at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland (OH).

Net Neutrality Win in the D.C. Circuit Court is a Win for the Arts

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

Here are three reasons the arts community should celebrate the network neutrality decision.

Cities, technology, the next generation of urban development, and the next Administration, part 1

Location:
Brookings, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

From the perspective of cities, the most significant policy may be Clinton’s endorsement of the civic Internet of Things.

Next-Generation Investments Do Not Depend on Killing Net Neutrality

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
3

The Federal Communications Commission took a highly touted step toward the future of wireless communications by opening up huge blocks of spectrum for “5G” broadband uses. Unfortunately, as advocates for Internet users point out, the FCC’s decision is by no means perfect. It doesn’t do enough to guarantee that shared use of spectrum — think Wi-Fi — will be a big part of the 5G equation.

When consumers want their traffic to be throttled

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

ne of the starting assumptions for the Open Internet order is that blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization are unilateral actions imposed by Internet service providers to maximize their own positions and will be necessarily harmful to consumer and application provider welfare.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee makes a last-minute plea to save net neutrality in Europe

Location:
Europe
Recommendation:
2

Berners-Lee, Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick, and Harvard law professor Larry Lessig urged European regulators to implement guidelines that would close loopholes in net neutrality legislation that the European Parliament approved in October 2015.

What the Comcast-Netflix deal says – and doesn’t say – about the Internet ecosystem

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

The investment advisory press is having a field day with the recently announced Comcast-Netflix deal. The deal, as the companies hope to eventually present it to consumers, will permit Comcast customers to subscribe to Netflix much as they already do to such premium offerings as HBO, Showtime, and Starz. Simple. But some in the blogosphere want to portray this deal as not just business but as détente in a war.

Comcast’s Netflix Deal Could Open a New Front in Net Neutrality War

Location:
Comcast, 1500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19102-2148, United States
Recommendation:
3

Watching Netflix using Comcast is about to get a little easier. The longtime rivals recently confirmed that Comcast’s X1 interactive television box will offer Netflix, obviating the need for a smart TV or third-party device like a Roku or Chromecast.

House Passes FCC-Blocking Finance Bill

Location:
Capitol Building, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, Washington, DC, 20002, United States
Recommendation:
4

The House passed the (FY) 2017 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill (HR 5485) that cuts the Federal Communications Commission budget and would prevent it from enforcing its network neutrality rules, implementing a new set-top box proposal, regulating broadband rates, or adopting new broadband privacy rules.

Public Knowledge Opposes Reckless House Spending Bill Targeting FCC and Consumers

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

Public Knowledge condemns this latest attempt to hijack critical funding legislation with dozens of provisions that will actively harm Americans, generally dislodge government processes, and once more take aim at the Federal Communications Commission's ability to do its job.

Why treating the Internet as a public utility is bad for consumers

Location:
Georgetown University, 37th & O Street NW Bunn Intercultural Center, 7th Floor, Washington, DC, 20007, United States
Recommendation:
3

Open Internet advocates celebrated long and loud in June when a federal court upheld the Federal Communications Commission’s “net neutrality” rules that prohibit broadband-access providers from blocking websites or accepting payment to prioritize traffic. But consumers and businesses should look beneath the rhetoric to see larger dangers lurking in the FCC’s actions.

Republican Reps Attack More FCC Regulations in Finance Bill

Location:
Capitol Building, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, Washington, DC, 20002, United States
Recommendation:
4

Republican and Democratic Reps took their fight over various Federal Communications Commission proposals and actions to the House floor as they debated the omnibus Financial Services Bill that includes the FCC's appropriation.

European telecoms groups unveil 5G manifesto

Location:
Brussels , Belgium
Recommendation:
2

Europe’s largest wireless carriers have pledged to launch superfast 5G networks in at least one city in every European Union country by 2020, as part of a manifesto signed by the heads of BT, Deutsche Telekom, Telecom Italia and Vodafone among others. But as a quid pro quo for more investment, controversial new EU rules on net neutrality should be watered down.

Will the Supreme Court take an interest in net neutrality?

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
1

The network neutrality opinion may be the most significant court decision in the telecom space since the Supreme Court’s Brand X decision a decade ago. In a highly deferential decision, the DC Circuit court ratified the Federal Communications Commission’s controversial reclassification of broadband Internet access as a Title II common carrier service, setting the stage for a broad regulatory agenda and permitting greater oversight over the Internet ecosystem. Given the stakes, it is unsurprising that the agency’s opponents refuse to throw in the towel, instead vowing to take the case to the Supreme Court. But will the high court take an interest in the case?

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Clinton Puts Forth a Tech Plan. Trump Doesn’t.

Location:
USA, United States
Recommendation:
2

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton unveiled her Technology & Innovation Agenda this week. Published on her website June 28, Clinton’s 14-page tech plan provides a detailed and ambitious policy agenda that covers a wide swath of critical telecom policy issues. The plan is organized around five major categories: the Economy, Digital Infrastructure, Advancing US Global Leadership, Privacy, and Smart Government. Below we examine the plan through our lens: broadband access, adoption, and use. Clinton’s tech plan is filled with so many proposals and goals that the best thing to do is just read it for yourself. Seriously. If you’re reading this article, you probably care about Internet adoption or net neutrality, spectrum policy or municipal broadband, privacy or diversifying the tech workforce. Her plan covers all of that. But, if you’re still reading this because you want the Reader’s Digest version, here goes.

Better Internet policy needed for minority communities

Location:
National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC), 55 S Grand Avenue, Pasadena, CA, 91105, United States
Recommendation:
2

A free and open internet creates more opportunities for diverse voices to organize, to share our stories and to transform culture, attitudes and beliefs about Latinos and other groups that have faced discrimination from mainstream American culture. In these ways, an affordable and open internet helps to create a more inclusive and accepting society, to break down barriers and to counteract fear and hate. Public policy should promote these values and ensure that the diversity of our nation is reflected in our media.

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Clinton Puts Forth a Tech Plan. Trump Doesn’t.

In what some have described as a “love letter to Silicon Valley”, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton unveiled her Technology & Innovation Agenda. Published on her website June 28, Clinton’s 14-page tech plan provides a detailed and ambitious policy agenda that covers a wide swath of critical telecom policy issues. The plan is organized around five major categories: the Economy, Digital Infrastructure, Advancing US Global Leadership, Privacy, and Smart Government. Below we examine the plan through our lens: broadband access, adoption, and use.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are worlds apart on tech policy issues

Location:
USA, United States
Recommendation:
4

Hillary Clinton laid out an extensive technology and innovation agenda in a briefing document that amounts to a giant valentine to Silicon Valley. Meanwhile, Clinton’s likely Republican rival for the White House, Donald Trump, seems to have gone out of his way to antagonize the tech sector.

Is the Open Internet Order an “Economics-Free Zone”?

Location:
Free State Foundation, 6259 Executive Blvd, Rockville, MD, 20852, United States
Recommendation:
3

Hi. I’m the “economics-free zone” guy. For those of you not deep in the weeds of network neutrality policy in the United States, I’m the former chief economist of the Federal Communications Commission who used that line as part of a self-deprecating joke I told to defuse tensions at a small but contentious conference on the FCC’s Open Internet Order.

Reactions to Hillary Clinton's Tech Agenda

Hillary Clinton unveiled a far-reaching plan explaining how her administration would approach technology issues, promising to connect all American homes to high-speed Internet by the end of the decade and revamping the country's education system to support foreign-born engineers and US entrepreneurs.

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Reactions to Hillary Clinton's Tech Agenda

Recommendation:
4

Hillary Clinton unveiled a far-reaching plan explaining how her administration would approach technology issues, promising to connect all American homes to high-speed Internet by the end of the decade and revamping the country's education system to support foreign-born engineers and US entrepreneurs.

What Brexit means for net neutrality in the EU

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

One of the many implications of the Brexit vote may be that American Internet companies could have an escape valve from the European Union’s fundamentally flawed regulation for online privacy. The question is whether the same self-determination can also apply to other areas of Internet regulation.

Net neutrality: Wireless should be looked at through a different lens

Location:
Mobile Ecosystem, 158 Winthrop Road, Brookline, MA, 02445, United States
Recommendation:
2

With the US Federal Appeals Court ruling earlier in June, it looks like network neutrality is here to stay, at least for now. Much ink has been spilled on both sides of this debate, but I’d like to weigh in on the wireless angle.

Investment and Network Neutrality

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
1

L. Gordon Crovitz claims that the 2015 network neutrality protections passed by the Federal Communications Commission and upheld in court “stifle the internet and discourage investing in broadband” (“A Shadow Falls Over Silicon Valley,” Information Age, June 20). Crovitz cites telecom-industry economist Hal Singer to support this notion. Singer’s flawed analysis is flat-out wrong. It uses selective data and excludes investments from the real total reported by broadband companies.

Net neutrality advocates to FCC: Put the kibosh on internet freebies

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

Representatives from Fight the Future, the Center for Media Justice and Free Press on June 24 hand-delivered a 6-foot tall package containing 100,000 letters of complaint to the Federal Communications Commission.

Chairman Wheeler: Still Eyeing Zero Rating Plans

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler says the FCC is continuing to vet information about zero rating plans to decide how they square with the general Internet conduct standard that allows the commission to identify practices that impede an open Internet.

Title II, cities, and the broadband agenda ahead

Location:
Brookings, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

The recent Court of Appeals decision upholding the Federal Communications Commission decision to classify broadband providers as common carriers is a huge personal victory for President Barack Obama and FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. It’s also a huge institutional victory for the FCC, establishing a clear foundation for it to establish rules for communications networks in the broadband era. What does this mean for the future of the nation’s broadband agenda?

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