Network Neutrality

Supreme Court Extends Time for Title II Appeal

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States, One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States

The Supreme Court has agreed to give Internet service providers more time to decide whether to appeal a DC Court's ruling upholding the Federal Communications Commission's Title II Open Internet order.

The rift between tech firms and activists

Location:
Washington, DC, United States

Big technology companies and their longtime allies on the grassroots left are at odds over how to deal with network neutrality — and the fight is getting nasty.

FTC Commissioner McSweeny to FCC: FTC's Consumer Protection Authority Insufficient to Discipline ISPs

Location:
Federal Trade Commission (FTC), 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC, 20580, United States

Federal Trade Commission member Terrell McSweeny has doubts that the agency's consumer protection authority is sufficient to discipline the actions of broadband internet access service (BIAS) providers if Title II is rolled back and the FTC regains BIAS oversight.

Record 9 million comments flood FCC on net neutrality

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

The US government has received more than 9 million public comments on rolling back network neutrality regulations, a record response to this hot-button issue that both sides argue plays an essential role in who gets Internet access.

Chairman Pai's Response to Sens Wyden, Schatz Regarding ECFS Cyberattack

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

On July 7, 2017, Sens Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Brian Schatz (D-HI) wrote to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai to express concern about the FCC facing a similar ...

Net Neutrality: The Social Justice Issue of Our Time

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

The internet plays a critical role in the dissemination of information and services specifically tailored for people of color and other marginalized groups, including LGBT people, because it provides the opportunity for us to tell our own stories and to organize for racial and social justice. That empowerment relies on an open internet and net neutrality.

The Internet Ripoff You're Not Protesting

Location:
Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, 23 Everett Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138, United States

All of this network neutrality action involves just the very last part of the communications grid in the US — the “last mile,” or the part of the network that actually touches consumers.

Remarks of Rachael Bender at the 33rd Annual Conference of the Caribbean Association of Network Telecommunications Organizations

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

[I]t is particularly important that the United States and Caribbean nations collaborate. Our countries share many common interests and significant cultural and economic ties.

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Independence, Net Neutrality, and E-rate are Thorny Issues at FCC Confirmation Hearing

Location:
Senate Commerce Committee, Constitution Avenue and 1st Street, NE Russell Senate Office Building - 253, Washington, DC, 20002, United States

On July 19, 2017, the Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing to examine the nominations of Ajit Pai, Jessica Rosenworcel, and Brendan Carr for seats on the Federal Communications Commission. On March 7, President Donald Trump nominated Pai, the FCC’s current chairman, for a second five-year term ending June 30, 2021. Rosenworcel is nominated for a term that would end June 30, 2020. Carr, the current general counsel at the FCC, has actually been nominated for two terms, one expiring June 30, 2018 and the second ending June 30, 2023. Carr served as legal adviser to then-FCC Commissioner Pai for three years before Pai was named chairman and appointed Carr as general counsel.

How net-neutrality advocates would let President Trump control the Internet

Location:
TechFreedom, Washington, DC, United States

Recently, millions of Americans, mainly on the left, rallied behind a cause larger than themselves: maximizing President Donald Trump’s power over the Internet. Wait. What?

Net Neutrality Or Continued Innovation? Can't We Have Both?

Location:
Georgetown University, 36th Street, NW & Prospect St, NW Walsh Building Room 395, Washington, DC, United States

These needless and dangerous innovation-killers, in addition to the other legal and economic problems caused by the hastily-crafted 2015 Open Internet order, justify FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal to reverse course and return ISPs to full participation in the Internet ecosystem, where they operated without violating even a strict definition of “net neutrality” for twenty years.

Net neutrality is dying with a whimper

Location:
USA, United States

Prior to the July 12 protest, news outlets were warning their readers to “prepare to be assaulted” by the extent of the protest, after major players like Google, Facebook, Netflix, and Amazon announced their participation in the Day of Action. But as many of those same news outlets have since pointed out, the aforementioned major players barely did anything to promote the protest where it counted: on their most visible and highly trafficked homepages and within their mobile apps.

Remarks of Commissioner Clyburn Appalachian Ohio-West VA Connectivity Summit

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

If you care about robust broadband, if you care about being able to use the internet without your service provider compromising your privacy, picking winners and losers online, if you want infrastructure built in your communities, then you cannot remain on the sidelines.

The White House Endorses the FCC’s effort to roll back its net neutrality rules

Location:
The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20500, United States

The Trump Administration has signaled that it stands behind efforts by the Federal Communications Commission and its Chairman, Ajit Pai, to roll back the agency's network neutrality regulations for Internet providers.

FCC refuses to release text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

The Federal Communications Commission has denied a request to extend the deadline for filing public comments on its plan to overturn net neutrality rules, and the FCC is refusing to release the text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints that it has received since June 2015.

Congress Should Decide Net Neutrality. Too Bad It Doesn't Have The Bandwidth

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, 20001, United States

As Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai moves his agency toward rolling back Obama-era network neutrality rules, more voices are calling for a lasting solution to the debate: a new law.

Internet Association blasts Fight for the Future for including Rep Scalise ad campaign

Location:
Internet Association, Washington, DC, United States

The Internet Association, a trade group representing internet companies, lashed out at a pro-net neutrality group July 18 for initially saying that they planned to go after Rep Steve Scalise (R-LA) with billboard attack ads.

OTI Urges FCC to Abandon “Radical” and “Extreme” Net Neutrality Plan

Location:
New America Foundation, 1899 L St NW, 4th Floor, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

The Open Technology Institute asked the Federal Communications Commission to rescind a dangerous proposal to repeal the agency’s 2015 network neutrality rules.

The Effect of Regulation on Broadband: Evaluating the Empirical Evidence in the FCC’s 2015 “Open Internet Order.” Net Neutrality Special Issue Blog #5

Location:
Technology Policy Institute, 1401 Eye NW, Washington, DC, 20005, United States

This blog post is the fifth in a series featuring the contents of a recent special issue of the Review of Industrial Organization, organized by the Technology Policy Institute and the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Technology, Innovation, and Competition.

Comcast accuses net neutrality advocates of not “living in the real world”

Location:
Comcast, 1500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19102-2148, United States

Comcast claimed that "the threat of Title II regulation" started harming broadband network investment in 2011—years before the US government decided to apply Title II regulations to broadband. Moreover, Comcast said that net neutrality proponents who claim that investment wasn't hurt by the Title II rules "aren't living in the real world."

Comcast’s Cohen: Broadband capex has declined by $3.6B under Title II

Location:
Comcast, 1500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19102-2148, United States

Capital expenditures by US internet service providers have declined by $3.6 billion since the Federal Communications Commission adopted its Title II regime for internet regulation in 2015, Comcast regulatory chief David L. Cohen said.

Fight for the Future brands Congressional boogeymen as ‘Team Cable’ in net neutrality fight

Location:
Fight for the Future, Boston, MA, 02205, United States

Offering up more proof that the term “cable” now strikes a very anticonsumerist tone, consumer group Fight For the Future is now labeling any Congressional representative who supports the Republican-led Federal Communications Commission’s quest to dismantle Title II internet regulation—or isn’t doing anything to stop it—as “Team Cable.”

Net Neutrality Challenges in the World: Zero-Rating in the European Union

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

According to our preliminary research, there is some form of zero-rating in 20 out of 28 European nations. Zero-rating spans European Union economies of all sizes, from the United Kingdom to Romania, Germany, and Spain.

Fight for the Future Turns Focus on the Hill

Location:
Fight for the Future, Boston, MA, 02205, United States

With the Internet Day of Action targeting the Federal Communications Commission now receding in the rearview mirror, organizer Fight for the Future (FFTF) is shifting its focus to Congress in its fight to retain Title II-based Open Internet rules.

Everyone claims to be for an open internet. So what’s the latest net neutrality fight really about?

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

The period of public comment on the network neutrality rule will close in mid-August, and the Federal Communications Commission could take a vote on a final decision as early as October. According to Sen Al Franken (D-MN), the strategy is to gin up so much negative public opinion that it pressures one of the Republican commissioners on the FCC board to change their mind, which would scuttle the policy change.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan And Others Take On FCC

Location:
Illinois General Assembly, Springfield, IL, 62706, United States

Attorney General Lisa Madigan led a coalition of 13 other attorneys general to oppose the rollback of critical net neutrality protections by the Federal Communications Commission.

President Trump's FCC Chief Has Failed to Justify His Campaign Against Net Neutrality

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States

On July 17, Free Press submitted comments to the Federal Communications Commission, demonstrating once again that the 2015 decision to base Net Neutrality rules on Title II got it exactly right.

Consumers Union Files Comments Urging FCC to Abandon Efforts to Repeal Net Neutrality

Location:
Consumers Union (DC office), 1101 17th Street NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Consumers Union, the policy and mobilization arm of Consumer Reports, once again urged the Federal Communications Commission to abandon efforts to unravel popular network neutrality rules.

Why were Facebook, Google, and Amazon so quiet about net neutrality?

Location:
USA, United States

In the weeks leading up to July 12's day of protest over network neutrality in the US, big tech names signed on to join the fight to keep it. Among them were some of the biggest names on the internet, including Amazon, Google, and Facebook, all of which have a vested business interest in all Americans being able to access their sites quickly and frequently. But those sites did not go dark July 12.

Sen Franken Joins the Millions of Americans Who are Fighting Loudly to Preserve Net Neutrality

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, United States

Sen Al Franken (D-MN) joined the millions of Americans who have weighed in with the Federal Communications Commission to protect network neutrality, the long-standing principle that what you read, see, or watch on the internet shouldn't be favored, blocked, or slowed down based on where that content comes from.

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