Network Neutrality

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Taking Away an Open Internet

Location:
1871, 222 W. Merchandise Mart Plaza Suite 1212, Chicago, IL, 60654, United States

We gather today at a critical moment in the history of an Open Internet; in the fight for Net Neutrality.

“Fake” net neutrality comments at heart of lawsuit filed against FCC

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

The Federal Communications Commission has ignored a public records request for information that might shed light on the legitimacy of comments on Chairman Ajit Pai's anti-net neutrality plan, according to a lawsuit filed against the FCC.

The Top-Five Threats to Your Rights to Connect and Communicate in the Trump Era

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States

The Trump administration, the Federal Communications Commission, Congress and greedy companies are attacking people’s rights to connect and communicate so relentlessly that staying on top of everything that’s happening can feel like an impossible task. That’s why we’ve put together this handy list of five of the biggest threats people are facing.

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Taking Away an Open Internet

We gather today at a critical moment in the history of an Open Internet; in the fight for Net Neutrality. So, right here at the outset, let’s make clear something that will bear repeating throughout these remarks: An Open Internet is the law of the land and any change to that policy would take away from consumers, innovators and the competitive marketplace something they have today. The proof point that opponents to an Open Internet must hurdle is the factual basis for why it is necessary to remove existing protections? Those protections can be boiled down to one simple principle: Consumers must be in charge of how they use their broadband connections, free from manipulation by their broadband providers.

Washington DC braces for net neutrality protests later this month

Location:
Washington, DC, United States

Network neutrality advocates are planning two days of protest in Washington DC in Sept as they fight off plans to defang regulations meant to protect an open internet.

What is the Open Internet Rule?

Location:
Brookings, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai plans to reverse the agency’s open internet rules passed in 2015.

In Response to Criticisms of Phoenix Center Research on Net Neutrality

Location:
Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal & Economic Public Policy Studi, Washington, DC, 20015, United States

Free Press, get offa my lawn.

Congress, don't let net neutrality debate fall victim to executive orders

Location:
Silicon Valley, Palo Alto, CA, United States

President Donald Trump’s recent Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) decision is a case study in the consequences of writing law through executive order. If congressional leadership does not take action, then network neutrality will meet DACA’s same fate.

Free Press to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai: Title II Network Neutrality Is Working

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States

Here’s what Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai refuses to admit: by every conceivable measure Title II network neutrality is working.

Without Net Neutrality, Pittsburgh Startups Might Not Ever Start Up

Location:
Pittsburgh, PA, United States

Without a fast website to facilitate that communication, Shenck, who is the vice president of engineering, said his company couldn’t operate. He said tech startups like his rely on the concept of net neutrality in order to succeed.

BendBroadband says it will keep open internet

Location:
BendBroadband, 63090 Sherman Rd, Bend, OR, United States

BendBroadband spokeswoman DeAnne Boegli said she’s not sure exactly how the Open Internet Order discourages capital investment by internet service providers. The company’s ...

The Future of Net Neutrality

Sep 14 2017 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location:
Omni Shoreham Hotel, 2500 Calvert Street, NW, Washington, DC, United States

Under the leadership of Chairman Ajit Pai, the FCC has moved to undo recently adopted net neutrality rules; a change that will remove a requirement that all internet service providers treat websites, data, and digital companies equally. Experts will examine the fallout of a reversal of net neutrality rules: Will Congress intervene? Will net neutrality end up in the courts again? What will it mean for the tech industry?

Major City Tech Leaders Fight for Net Neutrality, Other Issues in Washington, D.C.

Location:
Washington, DC, United States

Four of the country’s most prominent city tech leaders visited Washington, D.C., to discuss concern over the federal government’s handling of a trio of issues: Internet privacy, local authority of public assets, and, most notably, a potential rollback of network neutrality, which the group uniformly opposes.

Foster better politics for a stronger, more open internet

Location:
Progressive Policy Institute, 1101 14th St. NW, Washington, DC, 20005, United States

As the Federal Communications Commission repeals Title II and embarks on an uncertain new process, everyone has something to lose — which also means everyone has something ...

Remarks Of FCC Chairman Ajit Pai At The Institute For Policy Innovation's Hatton W. Sumners Distinguished Lecture Series

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

I’m going to talk about what the Federal Communications Commission is doing to promote innovation and investment across the Internet ecosystem.

The net neutrality hearing that wasn't

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States

House Republicans emerged from a month of network neutrality negotiations with no new draft bill text, said Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR).

Preserving a Free, Open & Innovative Internet

Sep 7 2017 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Location:
Omni Mandalay Hotel at Las Colinas, 221 East Las Colinas Boulevard, Irving, TX, 75039, United States

Chairman Pai on how the FCC is “Preserving a Free, Open & Innovative Internet.”

FCC must dump Obama's net neutrality rules for broadband

Location:
Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal & Economic Public Policy Studi, Washington, DC, 20015, United States

The Federal Communications Commission’s 2015 open internet order has long been a posterchild for bad law and worse economics. It has been labeled an “economics-free zone” by the FCC’s own chief economist.

The Times, They're Not A-Changin': The Continuing Case for an Open Internet

Sep 18 2017 - 8:00am - 10:00am
Location:
1871, 222 W. Merchandise Mart Plaza Suite 1212, Chicago, IL, 60654, United States

Tom Wheeler will ask a simple question: “What has happened in the past two years to justify a 180-degree reversal of Open Internet policy?” And his answer, “Nothing”. He will lay out the continuing case for an Open Internet, based on law and facts: protecting consumers and innovators; safeguarding free expression and economic opportunity; learning the lessons of the past; and anticipating the importance of future developments, like the Internet of Things.

Technology is outsmarting network neutrality

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Network neutrality is having a Gilda Radner moment. After years of debate, protests, name calling, and the like, technology is leaving net neutrality behind. Here are at least three indicators that technology is outsmarting net neutrality ...

Ajit Pai on Congress's role in the net neutrality debate

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

A Q&A with Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai.

My Insanely Long Field Guide to Common Carriage, Public Utility, Public Forum -- And Why the Differences Matter.

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Because whether and how to regulate various parts of the Internet supply chain (or, if you prefer, ecosystem), I will try to explain below why common carriage obligations, such as network neutrality, are different from public utility regulation (even though most utility providers are common carriers), which is different from natural monopoly regulated rate of return/tariffing/price regulation.

Net Neutrality and the FCC: Deja Vu All Over Again

Location:
USA, United States

We have come to the end of the comments period set by the Trump Federal Communications Commission (FCC) during which the public could respond to the FCC’s efforts to deregulate high-speed Internet service and roll back network neutrality rules that designate the Internet a utility.

How the FCC Redefined the Internet

Location:
Internet Innovation Alliance, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Is broadband internet an “information service,” as concluded repeatedly over two decades by Democratic and Republican commissioners, or a “telecommunications service” as a partisan majority decreed two years ago? This is a distinction with a profound legal difference under the Telecommunications Act of 1996.

Apple to FCC: Protect net neutrality and don’t allow online fast lanes

Location:
Apple, 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, CA, 95014, United States

Apple is breaking its silence on network neutrality, urging the Trump administration to preserve strong rules that prevent the likes of AT&T, Charter, Comcast and Verizon from blocking or interfering with web traffic.

American Cable Association: Title II Is Costly, Harmful, & Unnecessary

Location:
American Cable Association, One Parkway Center, Pittsburgh, PA, 15220, United States

The American Cable Association has taken what it hopes will be a parting shot at Title II classification for its members. In its comments to the Federal Communications Commission, ACA told the FCC that Title II reclassification had been costly; harmful, particularly to its members, and unnecessary.

The Comment Period Is Over, But the Battle for Net Neutrality Ain't Done Yet

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

Facing strong public opposition to his net neutrality rollback, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai may punt the issue to Congress, which is actually what the nation's largest ISPs want. The broadband industry's real goal, according to many tech policy experts, is to move this battle to the Republican-led US Congress, where deep-pocketed ISPs can lobby to craft internet policy rules that favor themselves. If the ISPs are successful, look for a spirited net neutrality debate this fall featuring Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN). This fight is far from over.

The net neutrality comment period was a complete mess

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

After months of debate, protests, and disruptions, the Federal Communications Commission’s comment period on its proposal to kill network neutrality is now over. The commission stopped accepting comments closing out with nearly 22 million total replies — setting an immense new record. The FCC’s previous comment record was just 3.7 million, set during the last net neutrality proceeding. But the process of receiving all those comments was far from smooth this time around.

AT&T absurdly claims that most “legitimate” net neutrality comments favor repeal

Location:
AT&T, 208 South Akard St, Dallas, TX, 75202, United States

Despite a study showing that 98.5 percent of individually written network neutrality comments support the US's current net neutrality rules, AT&T is claiming that the vast majority of "legitimate" comments favor repealing the rules.

Public Knowledge Files FCC Reply Comments to Preserve Net Neutrality Rules

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

The comments submitted in the record so far serve only to illustrate that the Federal Communications Commission was right in 2015 to classify broadband as a Title II service and to adopt Open Internet rules, and that the DC Circuit was right to uphold it.

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