Network Neutrality

We Just Won One of the Most Important Civil Rights Victories of the 21st Century

Location:
National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC), 55 S Grand Avenue, Pasadena, CA, 91105, United States
Recommendation:
2

We just won a historic victory, a critical step towards equality for Latinos in the digital age. Yet many American Latinos are unaware of this win and the tremendous potential it brings for us and our families to achieve full participation in the American Dream: better educations, better jobs, more financial stability and more political power.

FCC vs. FTC -- a new privacy turf war

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Federal Communications Commission is about to muscle in on the Federal Trade Commission’s privacy turf and the FTC is pushing back.

Five things that could kill network neutrality rules

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The tough network neutrality rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission are under attack on a variety of fronts; here are five threats facing the ...

FCC: Title II Suits Jumped Gun

Location:
United States Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation, One Columbus Circle, NE, Washington, DC, 20544-0005, United States
Recommendation:
2

Federal Communications Commission lawyers say the lawsuits filed against the commission's new Title II based network neutrality rules were filed prematurely and should be rejected on procedural grounds.

FCC Chairman Wheeler on the Choices in the Network Neutrality Debate

Location:
Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210, United States
Recommendation:
2

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler returned to Ohio State University – this time focusing his remarks on the FCC’s recent network neutrality order. He said the order “rests on a basic choice -- whether those who build the networks should make the rules by themselves or whether there should be a basic set of rules and a referee on the field to throw the flag if they are violated.”

Verizon tells Congress to step up to the plate

Location:
Verizon Communications, 140 West St, New York, NY, 10007, United States
Recommendation:
1

Lawmakers in Congress have largely ceded their ground to regulatory bureaucrats, the head of Verizon told legislators. In a letter to the bipartisan leaders of the House and Senate Commerce committees, CEO Lowell McAdam lent support to Congressional efforts to update the 1996 Telecommunications Act, saying the existing telecommunications laws and regulatory processes are “outdated and broken.”

Sprint CEO: Without Net neutrality rules, we're toast

Location:
Sprint Nextel, 6550 Sprint Parkway, Overland Park, KS, 66251, United States
Recommendation:
1

Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure praised the Federal Communications Commission's decision to implement rules governing the open Internet -- which includes wireless data -- arguing that his company couldn't survive without them.

When uncontrolled political powers want regulatory reform

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
1

What happens when political powers go out of their way to influence what is supposed to be an independent regulatory process?

Rep Butterfield wants Congress to take lead on Web rules

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
1

Unlike most Democrats, Rep GK Butterfield (D-NC), Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, wants a legislative fix on network neutrality. Rep Butterfield said the Federal Communications Commission's rule-making process has been "politically driven" by special interests and Congress needs to get involved.

How to end a fight over who should regulate Internet providers

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
1

Federal officials are discussing an end to the Federal Trade Commission's legal prohibition on regulating Internet providers and telecommunications companies -- a move that could give Washington wider authority to police perceived abuses and consumer harms in an increasingly important part of the economy. If the idea moves forward, it could mean that both the FTC and the Federal Communications Commission would have the power to go after misbehaving carriers.

Will Net Neutrality bust the FCC’s budget?

Location:
House Committee on Appropriations, 45 Independence Ave SW 2359 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

At a House Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee hearing, members heard another round of testimony from the dueling duo of network neutrality: Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler and FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai. It was the fourth hearing in seven days during which Republicans have put the FCC’s order to reclassify Internet service as a utility under intense questioning.

Sen Thune plots network neutrality budget amendment

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
1

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman John Thune (R-SD) is planning to introduce a nonbinding amendment on network neutrality.

Unnecessary Collateral Damage From FCC Title II Internet Regulation

Location:
Precursor, 7925 Jones Branch Drive, McLean, VA, 22102, United States
Recommendation:
1

The collateral damage is beginning to pile up from the Federal Communications Commission’s February decision to trigger Title II telephone utility regulation of the Internet.

How Techno-Populism Is Undermining Innovation

Apr 1 2015 - 9:00am - 10:30am
Location:
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), 1101 K Street, NW, Suite 610A, Washington, DC, 20005, United States

A new report from ITIF argues that an us vs. them populism has taken over technological debates in recent years and has had a deleterious effect on policymaking.

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Today's Quote 03.26.2015

Location:
House Judiciary Committee, Independence Avenue and South Capitol Street Rayburn House Office Building -- 2141, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
1

“You're playing God with the Internet … That's not your job.”
-- Rep Louie Gohmert (R-TX)

Rep Gohmert to FCC: ‘You’re playing God with the Internet’

Location:
House Judiciary Committee, Independence Avenue and South Capitol Street Rayburn House Office Building -- 2141, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
1

Rep Louie Gohmert (R-TX), an outspoken critic of the Federal Communications Commission's rules that prevent Internet providers from blocking Web sites or speeding some of them up over others, exploded during a House Judiciary Committee hearing. His voice rising to a shout, Rep Gohmert threw a stream of accusations at FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, complaining that the FCC had cut off Internet providers' ability to find new ways of making money. "Before the FCC came in, everybody could explore new business models," Rep Gohmert said. "You're playing God with the Internet … That's not your job."

Net neutrality hearing examines a false choice on antitrust

Location:
House Judiciary Committee, Independence Avenue and South Capitol Street Rayburn House Office Building -- 2141, Washington, DC, 20003, United States
Recommendation:
3

Opponents of network neutrality, still stinging from their recent defeat at the Federal Communications Commission, have taken their fight to Congress in a two-week marathon of hearings that concluded in the House Judiciary Committee. The March 25 hearing, provocatively titled "Wrecking the Internet to Save It?", examined whether antitrust law can address net neutrality better than the FCC's recently approved rules.

Some network neutrality advocates are worried about this small loophole in the FCC’s rules

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Even as federal officials prepare to defend their network neutrality regulation in court, attention is shifting to a part of the new Federal Communications Commission rules that could give Internet providers a loophole, according to some analysts. There is concern that Internet providers could mislabel some types of Internet content in order to avoid the strongest parts of the rules. The issue in question deals with what are known as "specialized services" -- a loosely defined category of Web applications that covers things like VoIP phone service, smart thermostats and real-time health monitoring.

Setting the record straight on a network neutrality fact check

Location:
Washington Post, 1150 15th St NW, Washington, DC, 20071, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Fact Checker certainly does not appreciate being misquoted.

Public Knowledge Urges House Judiciary to Preserve FCC Authority over Broadband

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

Some members of the [House Judiciary] committee have asked whether antitrust law is sufficient on its own to address broadband policy in the digital age. As on all previous occasions anyone has seriously looked at this question, the answer, once again, is ‘no.’

First Round of Lawsuits Filed in Network Neutrality Case. Now What?

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

The US Telecom Association (USTA), the trade association for incumbent telecoms like Verizon and AT&T, and a Texas Wireless Internet Service Provider called Alamo Broadband, filed separate appeals from the Federal Communications Commission’s Order reclassifying broadband as Title II and applying network neutrality rules. USTA filed in the DC Circuit, while Alamo filed in the 5th Circuit -- a court that is typically more hostile to the FCC.

Potential for a bipartisan bill on net neutrality emerges in Congress

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
1

Leading Republicans want to limit the broad authority the Federal Communications Commission asserted to police broadband after classifying it as a more highly regulated utility-like service under Title 2 of the Communications Act. And to do that, the GOP lawmakers reversed long-standing opposition to the need for network neutrality regulations and have proposed codifying the meat of the FCC's order: prohibitions on Internet service providers from blocking, slowing or selling priority delivery of content to consumers.

Chairmen Upton & Walden Comment on Filing of First Network Neutrality Appeals

Location:
House Commerce Committee, 45 Independence Ave SW 2123 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

The inevitable legal wrangling has begun. These filings are the first in what will undoubtedly be years of challenges spurred by the FCC’s unnecessary and inappropriate regulation of the Internet. Congress has the opportunity to change this poorly-chosen course and enact durable solutions that protect consumers. The door remains open to our colleagues so we can make Open Internet protections a reality.

The FCC’s Net Neutrality Order Protects Internet Freedom by Restoring the Law

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
2

“So, are there any surprises?” That’s the No. 1 question we’ve been asked since the Federal Communications Commission released the text of its order reclassifying broadband access as a common-carrier service under Title II of the Communications Act --  the step needed to provide real Network Neutrality protections for Internet users. And after a close read, the answer is no.

Network neutrality rules let FCC police future ISP conduct

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Federal Communications Commission’s new network neutrality rules allow the agency to police future network management practices and business models rolled out by broadband providers, raising concerns among critics that an activist commission will inject itself into ISP board rooms. The so-called future conduct standard in the FCC’s new rules leave questions about what ISP practices the agency will allow, critics say.

The Obamanet Crack-Up

Location:
Wall Street Journal, 1211 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY, 10036, United States
Recommendation:
1

Congress held three hearings -- two more are planned -- to surface new information on how the White House political machine bullied Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler to regulate the Internet.

Wheeler’s Slyly Subtle Subterfuge

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
1

Given Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler’s successful background in the telecom, cellular, Internet and venture-capital industries and his prior position on Internet regulation, one must wonder why he produced such a flawed, counterproductive set of regulations.

AT&T is using the Title II rules it hates to get millions in refunds

Location:
AT&T, 208 South Akard St, Dallas, TX, 75202, United States
Recommendation:
1

AT&T has spent a year railing about how awful it would be if the Federal Communications Commission applied common carrier rules to Internet service. It doesn't make sense "to take a regulatory framework developed for Ma Bell in the 1930s and make her great grandchildren, with technologies and options undreamed of eighty years ago, live under it," the company said in February just after the FCC voted to reclassify broadband providers as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act. Yet in an area where the Title II rules already apply (telephone service), AT&T now stands to get millions in refunds for network connection charges precisely because of the same rules that ban unjust and unreasonable charges for telecommunications services.

GOP has knives out for network neutrality

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

Republicans are trying to transform the Federal Communications Commission’s network neutrality rules into the same sort of drawn-out controversy as Benghazi and Obamacare -- providing a new springboard for sustained political attacks on the White House.

Government Is Crashing the Internet Party

Location:
FL, United States
Recommendation:
1

The Internet, more than any invention in history, brings together a perfect storm of free market forces: low barriers to entry, unencumbered contact between consumers and providers, and instant feedback for new ideas. It has become a thriving exhibition of the power of free people operating in a free market to create prosperity and opportunity. Predictably, the federal government wants to crash the party.

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