Online privacy

DHS Working with Google to Improve Screening Techniques at Airpots

Location:
Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC, 20528, United States

The Department of Homeland Security is turning to data scientists to improve screening techniques at airports. On June 22, the department, working with Google, will introduce a $1.5 million contest to build computer algorithms that can automatically identify concealed items in images captured by checkpoint body scanners.

Chairman Blackburn Criticizes Democratic Reps for Not Rallying Behind Privacy Bill

Location:
House Subcommittee on Communications, Technology and Internet, Independence Avenue and South Capitol Street, Washington, DC, 20003, United States

House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) chastised Democratic Reps for not rallying around her internet privacy bill, after they criticized the GOP’s efforts to kill privacy restrictions earlier in 2017.

You're sharing your cell phone number too frequently

Location:
USA, United States

No matter what Americans do to protect their digital privacy, especially on our handheld devices, it’s impossible to keep up with new threats. Now, there’s a new risk to our privacy and security: Our cell phone numbers are being used increasingly by information brokers as the window to personal information that’s kept by nearly all corporations, financial institutions, and, yes, social media networks.

A Republican contractor’s database of nearly every voter was left exposed on the Internet for 12 days, researcher says

Location:
USA, United States

A Republican analytics firm's database of nearly every registered American voter was left vulnerable to theft on a public server for 12 days in June, according to a cybersecurity researcher who found and downloaded the trove of data.

California Broadband Internet Privacy Bill a Model for the States

Location:
Consumer Federation of America, 1620 I Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20006, United States

[Commenary] On June 19, California Assemblymember Ed Chau introduced a bill to give people in that state the broadband privacy rights that they lost in Congress. This legislation has all of the key elements that are needed to protect broadband users’ privacy.

Wikileaks Reveals How the CIA Could Hack Your Router

Location:
Central Intelligence Agency, Langley, VA, United States

Your Wi-Fi router, sitting in the corner of your home accumulating dust and unpatched security flaws, provides an attractive target for hackers. Including, according to a new WikiLeaks release, the CIA.

FCC makes net neutrality commenters’ e-mail addresses public through API

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

If you’re one of the many people filing comments on the Federal Communications Commission plan to gut network neutrality rules, be aware that your e-mail address and any other information you submit could be made public.

House Democrats Make Rhetorical Push for Internet Privacy

Location:
House Commerce Committee, 45 Independence Ave SW 2123 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC, 20515, United States

Mounting security concerns surrounding the proliferation of wireless devices is renewing a long-running internet privacy debate. Traditional partisan rifts over regulation of private companies exploded at a hearing of the House Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology.

FCC Chairman Pai Circulates Item on Broadband Privacy

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States

New to the Federal Communications Commission’s list of items on circulation an un-docketed item on protecting the privacy of customers of broadband and other telecommunications services; implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996; and telecommunications carriers' use of CPNI and other customer information.

How should an originalist rule in the Fourth Amendment cell-site case?

Location:
George Washington University Law School, 2000 H Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20052, United States

The Supreme Court recently agreed to hear Carpenter v. United States, a case on whether the Fourth Amendment protects historical cell-site records. In this post, I want to focus on a small but potentially important part of the Carpenter litigation: How should an originalist Justice vote in the case?

Algorithm’s decisions draw increased scrutiny

Location:
Brookings, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Though algorithms handle digital data, their decisions also have consequences in the analog world.

Public Knowledge Urges FTC Chairman Ohlhausen to Protect Consumer Privacy

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Public Knowledge joined Consumer Federation of America, Center For Digital Democracy, Consumer Action, Consumer Federation of California, and Privacy Rights Clearinghouse in a letter urging Federal Trade Commission Acting Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen to protect consumer privacy.

Survey: Consumers Uncomfortable With Smart TV Data Collection

Location:
USA, United States

Consumers aren’t comfortable with their data being collected by smart TVs, according to a survey conducted by Videa, Cox Media’s automated ad platform.

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The BROWSER Act

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States

On May 18, House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) introduced the BROWSER Act (H.R. 2520), legislation that would apply privacy regulations to both Internet service providers (ISPs) and edge providers (e.g., Netflix and Facebook). Most notably, the bill would require companies to obtain users' permission before sharing their sensitive information, including web-browsing history, with advertisers. The legislation is surprising, as it comes just weeks after Blackburn led the vote to repeal the Federal Communications Commission’s privacy protections for broadband subscribers. Below we unpack the BROWSER Act and take a look at what to expect in the weeks ahead.

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The BROWSER Act

On May 18, House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) introduced the BROWSER Act (H.R. 2520), legislation that would apply privacy regulations to both Internet service providers (ISPs) and edge providers (e.g., Netflix and Facebook). Most notably, the bill would require companies to obtain users' permission before sharing their sensitive information, including web-browsing history, with advertisers. The legislation is surprising, as it comes just weeks after Blackburn led the vote to repeal the Federal Communications Commission’s privacy protections for broadband subscribers. Below we unpack the BROWSER Act and take a look at what to expect in the weeks ahead.

FTC Announces Third PrivacyCon, Calls for Presentations

Location:
Federal Trade Commission (FTC), 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC, 20580, United States

Building on the success of its two previous PrivacyCon events, the Federal Trade Commission is announcing a call for presentations for its third PrivacyCon, which will take place on February 28, 2018.

Chairman Blackburn desperately seeks Democrat to co-sponsor internet privacy bill

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, United States

House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) is asking Democratic Reps to cosponsor her new internet privacy bill, intended to replace Federal Communications Commission privacy protections that Republicans killed earlier in 2017.

It would be a mistake for Congress to prohibit targeted advertising online

Location:
NetChoice, 1401 K. Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20005, United States

On its face, the BROWSER Act seems like pro-consumer privacy legislation. But it’s actually an awful deal for Americans who’ve come to depend on free online content and services.

Week ahead: New GOP push on internet privacy

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
3

Lawmakers could be looking at a new fight over internet privacy, as they return to Washington after their weeklong Memorial Day recess.

The BROWSER Act: A privacy misstep

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

Like the network neutrality debate, the privacy debate has been hijacked by noise rather than analysis, filling the zeitgeist with several misconceptions about the state of American privacy law.

How Washington is throwing away its shot at protecting your privacy

Location:
USA, United States
Recommendation:
3

] When Congress killed Federal Communications Commission rules that would stop internet providers from selling your browsing history to advertisers, supporters of that move told upset internet users to cheer up. Two months later, something interesting has happened: A new bill by House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN).

Chairman Blackburn Working on Making Privacy Bill Bipartisan

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
3

House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) says she’s working to get some Democratic Reps on board to the BROWSER Act, her broadband privacy bill that would require both companies like Google and internet service providers to develop opt-in policies for sharing users’ sensitive data.

A Counterproductive Privacy Bill

Location:
Technology Policy Institute, 1401 Eye NW, Washington, DC, 20005, United States
Recommendation:
3

Privacy activists appear to have some new friends among congressional Republicans. House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and cosponsors have introduced comprehensive privacy legislation that would apply a strict new privacy regime across the entire internet ecosystem.

How Congress dismantled federal Internet privacy rules

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

Congressional Republicans knew their plan was potentially explosive.

More Tech Reaction to Blackburn Privacy Bill

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

Oracle plans to send a letter voicing its support of House telecom subcommittee Chairman Marsha Blackburn's (R-TN) new privacy bill. The recently introduced legislation would ...

Google now knows when its users go to the store and buy stuff

Location:
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA, 94043, United States
Recommendation:
2

Google will begin using data from billions of credit and debit card transactions — including card numbers, purchase amounts and time stamps — to solve the advertising juggernaut’s long-standing quest to prove that online ads prompt consumers to make purchases in brick-and-mortar stores.

FCC's O'Rielly Hopes To Block State Privacy Laws

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

Congress's decision to repeal the nationwide broadband privacy rules appears to have spurred lawmakers in at least a dozen states to introduce new measures that would protect residents' online privacy. Now, at least one Republican on the Federal Communications Commission wants the agency to enact regulations that would prohibit states from enacting their own privacy rules.

Rep Blackburn bill would extend privacy rules to Google & Facebook

Location:
Capitol Building, E Capitol St NE & 1st St NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

House Communications Subcommittee Chairwoman Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) introduced a bill that would apply privacy rules to internet service providers like AT&T and Comcast and web companies such as Google and Facebook.

President Trump has a long history of secretly recording calls, according to former associates

Location:
Trump Tower, 725 5th Ave, New York, NY, 10022, United States
Recommendation:
2

Throughout Donald Trump’s business career, some executives who came to work for him were taken aside by colleagues and warned to assume that their discussions with the boss were being recorded.

Taking the Fight for Digital Rights to Our Libraries

Location:
New America, 740 15th Street NW Suite 900, Washington, DC, 20005, United States
Recommendation:
3

Increasingly, the library is the place where people trust—and use—not just the librarian at the help desk, but also the search engine, online catalogs, digital archives, and ...

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