Nancy Scola

Twitter says President Trump not immune from getting kicked off

Twitter said that not even President Donald Trump is immune from being kicked off the platform if his tweets cross a line with abusive behavior.

How President Trump could hurt Google

While President Donald Trump has few direct ways of going after Google, his administration and allies in Congress could find ways to make life difficult for the company. Antitrust officials at the Justice Department or Federal Trade Commission, fo

Industry Thoughts for FTC

The News Media Alliance, which represents the newspaper industry, laid out a potential antitrust case against its foes, Google and Facebook, in comments filed with the Federal Trade Commission.

Tech scrambles to navigate White House privacy push

The Trump administration is exploring some sort of national privacy proposal amid efforts by the European Union and California to impose their own data requirements on the tech industry.

The Trump appointee making Silicon Valley sweat

Makan Delrahim, who heads the Justice Department’s antitrust division, has spent months laying out a case for greater scrutiny of the country’s powerful technology industry, making the argument in speeches from Chicago to Rome. And his rhetoric —

What could President Trump do to Amazon?

President Donald Trump’s repeated Twitter attacks on Amazon have already dented the e-commerce giant’s stock price.

Can Lobbying Be Automated?

Could the swamp really be automated? The question feels almost alien.

EPIC Files FOIA for Docs on Trump-Pai Meeting

The relationship between new Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai and President Donald Trump is likely to continue to be a focal point for technology and telecommunications watchers.

Trump's fleeting tweets alarm archivists

President Donald Trump sent a number of tweets to the 23.5 million followers of his personal Twitter account.

Federal workers' Twitter brushfire burns President Trump

President Donald Trump may be a master of combat on Twitter, but he’s suddenly run into a growing digital uprising — anonymous federal workers who are using social media to tweak the president even as his agencies crack down on information-sharing