Fast Company

Why Academics Are Incensed By Facebook's Emotion-Manipulating Social Experiment

For a long time, Facebook operated under an incisive motto: "Move fast and break things." Acting on this mantra has a tendency to upset Facebook's change-averse user base -- and sometimes, Facebook doesn't even have to break anything.

ESPN's New World Cup Livestreaming Record Proves No One Did Work Today

According to ESPN, there were 1.7 million concurrent streams of the US-Germany World Cup match on its WatchESPN service. That crushes the previous high of 750,000 concurrent streams set by the last match between Mexico and Brazil.

Why Hackers Should Care About Accessibility

Most people think of "accessibility" as those little-used options on their computer for disabled users.

Once Browser Tech Partners, Google And Apple Are Divorcing. Is The Web In Trouble?

[Commentary] It’s a little more than a year since Google launched Blink, a custom engine used by Chrome to turn HTML and CSS code into what you see on your screen.

Inside Google's World Cup Newsroom

Inside a San Francisco office building, Google is trying its latest experiment: original sports journalism. When the 2014 World Cup began, Google unveiled a World Cup Trends Newsroom to turn search data surrounding soccer games into infographics.

How Twitter Is Preparing For the World Cup

When you walk around the offices of Twitter’s engineering department, located on the sixth floor of the company’s downtown San Francisco headquarters, you will see signs counting down the days until the World Cup.

Can Governments Get Economic Data From People On The Street?

If you’re a college student in Buenos Aires or Chennai, you may have come across an unorthodox way of making extra money.

If Net Neutrality Is Such A Big Deal, How Come It's Not In The News?

Network neutrality is one of business and government's biggest ongoing debates. But even though our lives are increasingly influenced and determined by online interactions, many people have no idea what the phrase means.

The Internet Companies That Protect Your Privacy When the Government Starts Prying

With the Snowden revelations, we learned a lot more about how the government snoops into the lives of US citizens and how technology companies help them do it.

What Google Search Algorithm Changes Do To The Internet

Matt Cutts, a senior member of Google's webspam team, announced in early 2014 that Google is working on a new version of their algorithm designed to help small businesses by pushing spammers and content mills into far less prominent search results