Localism

In exchange for obtaining a valuable license to operate a broadcast station using the public airwaves, each radio and television licensee is required by law to operate its station in the “public interest, convenience and necessity.” This means that it must air programming that is responsive to the needs and problems of its local community of license. In addition, how other media facilitate community discussions.

The FCC Ignores Reality in 5G Proposal

The Coalition for Local Internet Choice and the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors asked for my view of the Federal Communications Commission’s pending order, proposing to cap the fees that state and local governments

The BDAC, 5G and Cities: The Power and Perils of Asymmetry

[Speech] On of the two historic accomplishments of the current Federal Communications Commission is that it is the first FCC to interpret its statutory mandate to say it doesn’t have much legal authority or policy rights to regulate broadcasters,

Think of the Public Before the Broadcasters

[Commentary] As the son of a broadcast pioneer who got his license from the Department of Commerce in 1923 and as a former broadcaster myself, I read with great sadness “FCC to Lift Limits on Media Deals.” Although Federal Communications Commissio

CWA BDAC Representative Expresses Concern With FCC's Draft Wireless Order

As the Communications Workers of America’s representative on the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee’s Model Code for Municipalities Working Group, I filed a letter on September 18, 2018, to express concern with the Federal Communications Comm

Understanding the FCC’s Proposed Small Cell Order

On September 5, the Federal Communications Commission released the text of an order in its ongoing proceeding to streamline the rollout of infrastructure for broadband services, including small cells for 5G wireless service.

Sponsor: 

American Enterprise Institute

Date: 
Mon, 09/17/2018 - 10:00 to 11:45

The Federal Communications Commission has a key role in the United States’ transition to fifth-generation (5G) wireless technologies and infrastructure. New technologies and devices connecting to the internet as part of the Internet of Things will radically increase the amount of traffic on the network, and important applications such as self-driving cars and health applications will rely on 5G to function.



Local Officials Mull Suing the FCC

National organizations representing municipalities are rebelling against Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr’s plan to streamline the deployment of the 5G wireless infrastructure known as small cells. The proposal, set for a Sept.

FCC Announces Tentative Agenda for September 2018 Open Meeting

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai announced that the following items are tentatively on the agenda for the September Open Commission Meeting scheduled for Wednesday, September 26, 2018:

Sponsor: 

Radically Rural

Hannah Grimes Center for Entrepreneurship

Date: 
Fri, 09/28/2018 - 08:30 to 10:30

You may be surprised to learn that newspaper audiences are larger today than ever due to myriad platforms on which news is published – print, websites, online newsletters, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, video and more. What would you do as an editor for a day? What would your coverage and story assignments be? What would you publish in print, online and in social media? What would your front page look like? An engaging interactive event with live video and a press run. 



Sponsor: 

Radically Rural

Hannah Grimes Center for Entrepreneurship

Date: 
Thu, 09/27/2018 - 14:00 to 16:00

Small town newspapers, challenged by evaporating advertising revenues, mergers and declining circulation, struggle to sustain themselves. What can be done to keep local journalism strong, relevant, necessary and avoid news deserts?

Speakers:  Al Cross, director Institute for Rural Journalism, University of Kentucky

Panel discussion: Mark Guerringue, publisher The Daily Sun, Conway, NH; Keith Gentili, Editor and Publisher, The New Boston Beacon; Paul Miller, executive editor, The Keene Sentinel