Gigi Sohn

Breaking down the FCC’s proposal to destroy net neutrality

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The first half of the Federal Communications Commission’s Restoring Internet Freedom notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) sets out the FCC majority’s proposal for reversing classification of broadband internet access services as “telecommunications services” governed by Title II of the Communications Act. The second half purports to “re-evaluate” the existing net neutrality rules, the mechanisms that enforce them and any legal authority (other than Title II) that could be used to support them.

Net Neutrality 101: What you need to know to survive the next 6+ months of debate

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

On May 18, the Trump Federal Communications Commission will vote to adopt a final “Notice of Proposed Rulemaking” (NPRM) that will officially begin the effort to repeal the 2015 network neutrality rules and the legal authority upon which they are based — Title II of the Communications Act of 1934.

The FCC’s plan to kill net neutrality will also kill internet privacy

Location:
Open Society Foundations, 224 West 57th Street, New York, NY, 10019, United States
Recommendation:
3

After Congress repealed the Federal Communications Commission’s broadband privacy rules two weeks ago, new FCC Chairman Ajit Pai promised the American people that he would ensure that the personal information they give to their Internet service providers would continue to be protected.

You have just hours to stop Congress from giving away your web browsing history

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States

On a party-line vote, the Senate voted to repeal the Federal Communications Commission’s 2016 broadband privacy rules giving consumers the power to choose how their Internet service providers use and share their personal data. Now the House of Representatives will vote, and if the House also votes to repeal the rules, the bill will go to President Trump, who is expected to sign it.

FCC, FTC are playing a shell game with online privacy

Location:
Open Society Foundations, 224 West 57th Street, New York, NY, 10019, United States
Recommendation:
3

The Federal Communications Commission and Congress are taking steps to weaken and eliminate the FCC’s privacy rules for broadband Internet service providers (ISPs) like Comcast and AT&T. The proponents of these efforts make two arguments - neither of which will leave consumers with the privacy protections they now have and deserve.

Real net neutrality is rooted in Title II

Location:
Open Society Foundations, 400 West 59th Street, New York, NY, 10019, United States
Recommendation:
2

"I favor net neutrality, but I oppose Title II." This should fool no one — there's no net neutrality without clear FCC authority to protect consumers and competition in the broadband market. Right now, that authority is vested in Title II.

benton logo

First Lifeline, Now Broadband Program for Schools and Libraries in the FCC’s Crosshairs

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

First the new Federal Communications Commission majority revoked the approval of nine companies to become Lifeline providers, a move that will weaken the Lifeline program and widen the digital divide. Now it appears that the E-Rate program, which makes broadband services more affordable for America’s schools and libraries, is in the FCC majority’s crosshairs. And much like in the case of Lifeline, the majority is using procedural steps and administrative tools to weaken the E-Rate program.

benton logo

Defending the Indefensible: Chairman Pai’s Lifeline Reversal Will Widen the Digital Divide

Recommendation:
2

To my great surprise and delight, the recent move by the Federal Communications Commission's new majority to revoke the designations of nine companies as Lifeline providers has provoked a firestorm in the press, on social media, and on the Hill. The furor has been so intense that FCC Chairman Ajit Pai felt moved to defend the decision on Medium this week. But the Chairman doth protest too much. His thin arguments fail to mask two clear truths:
1) His actions will make the market for Lifeline broadband services less competitive, limiting choice and keeping prices high. As a result, fewer low income Americans will be able to afford broadband; and
2) He, and fellow FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly, fundamentally disagree with the structure and goals of the Lifeline program and will seek to undermine it in word and deed.

The Future of Local Internet Choice

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

I am honored to receive the National Champion for Local Internet Choice Award. And I am humbled to be recognized alongside the other award winners, each of whom have been ...

Remarks of Gigi Sohn, Counselor to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler at "Connecting Anchor Institutions: A Broadband Action Plan" Launch

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

PokemonGO is a mobile game where you use your phone to find virtual creatures in the real world, and in one week the game already has as many active users as Twitter. In this game, libraries, schools and hospitals across America are what they call Pokestops, where you can collect items to play the game. Libraries across the country are using their Twitter accounts to tout their Pokestop status to attract patrons.In the game, as in real life, anchor institutions are the heart of the community, and their utility extends beyond their core mission.

Very Gradual Change We Can Believe In: FCC’s Gigi Sohn at The National Digital Inclusion Summit

Location:
Kansas City, MO, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Lifeline order is a big deal in its own right, but it’s part of a much greater accomplishment that I don’t think people rightly appreciate – largely because it happened so gradually over of span of seven years. I’m talking about universal service reform writ large.

Remarks of Gigi Sohn on Lifeline and Broadband Adoption

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler proposal to modernize the Lifeline program and refocus it on making broadband service affordable for low income consumers. Here’s some concerns we’re hearing ...

FCC’s Gigi Sohn Remarks on Lifeline Modernization at the Digital Pathway Summit

Location:
Amelia Island, FL, United States
Recommendation:
2

In remarks at the Digital Pathway Summit, the Federal Communications Commission’s Gigi Sohn focused her remarks on broadband adoption and, in particular, the commission’s efforts to modernize the Lifeline program which ensures the affordability of communications services. Noting recent Pew Research Center findings, she noted that home broadband adoption seems to have plateaued. Although people – just about everyone – understand that broadband has gone from luxury to necessity. The major barrier to adoption these days is cost. To address that, the FCC is working to expand its Lifeline program to allow discounts for broadband service.

FCC’s Gigi Sohn at the European Competitive Telecommunications Association Regulatory Conference

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

To help solve this divide, international governments, non-governmental organizations, and major corporations have come together to sponsor initiatives like “Global Connect” -- a program that seeks to connect an additional 1.5 billion people to the Internet by 2020.

Remarks of FCC’s Gigi Sohn on the Digital Divide

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

When thinking about the digital divide in America, I find that a useful number to wrap your brain around the nature of the challenge is 50/50. Let me elaborate.

Consumer Protection in the Broadband Era: The Role of the FCC

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The first goal of this talk is to demonstrate the breadth, importance and impact of the Federal Communications Commission's consumer protection activities.

Remarks of FCC's Gigi Sohn at NATOA Conference

Location:
2015 NATOA Conference, San Diego, CA, United States
Recommendation:
2

Without question, the landscape is changing for local governments, but in a good way. Most significantly, the future is not in cable, but in broadband. Even the cable operators acknowledge this.

Remarks of FCC’s Gigi Sohn at Fiber on Fire Conference

Location:
Anaheim, CA, United States
Recommendation:
2

When I learned the theme of this conference, “Fiber on Fire,” I thought it was fitting that I would be here. That’s because when it comes to fiber deployment, the Federal Communications Commission is fired up to ensure that Americans have a fast and vibrant Internet ecosystem.

Remarks Of FCC’s Gigi Sohn At Westminster's Fiber Launch Party

Location:
Westminster, MD, United States
Recommendation:
2

What is happening today is a great example of local communities and their leaders taking control of their broadband future. Westminster (MD) has chosen to engage in a private-public partnership with Ting, which will be providing the city with what they call "crazy fast fiber Internet."

Remarks of FCC's Gigi Sohn at Third Annual New York State Broadband Summit

Location:
New York, NY, United States
Recommendation:
2

I want to talk to you about why the leadership at the Federal Communications Commission -- America's broadband agency -- is watching the New NY Broadband Program closely and pulling for its success.

FCC's Sohn Remarks: "Halftime at the Wheeler FCC"

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

If I had to use a football metaphor to describe where we are at the Federal Communications Commission today, I would say that we'ere at halftime -- although without rest or refreshments.

Remarks of FCC’s Gigi Sohn at Moving Forward Toward A Gigabit State

Location:
CT, United States
Recommendation:
2

Today, I want to talk to you about why the leadership at the Federal Communications Commission -- America's broadband agency -- is watching the CTgig Project closely and pulling for its success.

Setting the Record Straight on Open Internet Comments

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

Some key takeaways from the Federal Communications Commission inquiry into Open Internet comments ...

FCC Releases Open Internet Reply Comments to the Public

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

In the interest of ensuring that the public has open access to the nearly 2.5 million reply comments that were filed in the Open Internet/network neutrality docket during the official reply comment period (July 19-September 15), the Federal Communications Commission is releasing those reply comments in one zipped XML file.

The Art of the Possible

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

For folks like me who have been toiling to open up closed networks to the public for decades, what makes the Internet so earth shattering is that it turns our old system of command and control communications networks on its head. For the first time, rather than begging for scraps of access from the largest media companies, it is possible to put the power of those networks into the hands of ordinary people, so that they can speak and be heard without permission.

FCC Makes Open Internet Comments More Accessible to Public

Location:
fcc, United States
Recommendation:
3

As of August 4, over 1.1 million comments were filed in the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet docket. Every comment will be reviewed as part of the official record of this proceeding.

Answers to Common Questions about the E-Rate Modernization Proposal to Get Wi-Fi in ALL Schools and Libraries

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
4

Closing the Wi-Fi Gap by connecting all schools and libraries is a laudable goal, but how do the numbers add up over a five-year period? We are on track to free $2 billion in reserves that we are prepared to spend over the next two funding years.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of the Net Neutrality Oral Argument

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

While some have portrayed the likely outcome of the DC Circuit Court’s oral argument on Verizon’s challenge to the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet order as a victory for anti-network neutrality forces and a loss for its supporters, the reality is much more complicated. There are some pretty clear takeaways, some good, some bad and some just plain ugly.

Clarifying What I Would Do If I Were FCC Chair

Location:
Public Knowledge, 1818 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
1

During a Free State Foundation panel, I stated that one of my five priorities as Federal Communications Commission chair would be to “[e]nsure that the agency has authority to protect consumers and competition with regard to broadband Internet access, depending on the DC Circuit’s decision in the open Internet case.”

Should Congress Overturn the Network Neutrality Rules?

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

Arguing against the network neutrality rules is Thomas W. Hazlett, professor of law and economics at George Mason University in Fairfax County (VA), where he directs the Information Economy Project. Dr. Hazlett previously served as chief economist of the Federal Communications Commission. Taking a stance in favor of the network neutrality rules is Gigi Sohn, president and chief executive of Public Knowledge, an open-Internet advocacy group based in Washington (DC).