Civic Engagement

Net Neutrality Activists Rally Against Trump FCC's Plan to Destroy the Internet

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
3

People from across the country have already generated more than 1 million comments and signatures opposing Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai’s destructive plan to kill network neutrality. And outside the agency’s headquarters May 18, a range of advocacy groups, members of Congress and nearly 100 activists rallied to preserve the open internet.

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FCC Reopens Net Neutrality Debate, Seeking “Substantive” Public Comment

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

On May 18, 2017, the Republican commissioners on the Federal Communications Commission voted to reopen the debate over how to best preserve an Open Internet. Launching a proceeding seeking “substantive” public comment, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai proposed undoing the only legal basis for network neutrality rules that has survived court challenge. The unreleased Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) proposes to reverse the FCC’s 2015 ruling that the transmission component of broadband Internet access service (BIAS) is a telecommunications service. The NPRM also proposes to 1) return to the FCC’s original classification of mobile broadband Internet access service as a private mobile service; and 2) eliminate the Internet conduct standard created by the 2015 Order. Finally, the NPRM questions the need for the FCC’s so-called “bright-line rules” which prohibit broadband providers from a) blocking access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices; b) impairing or degrading lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices; and c) favoring some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration of any kind—in other words, no "fast lanes."

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FCC Reopens Net Neutrality Debate, Seeking “Substantive” Public Comment

On May 18, 2017, the Republican commissioners on the Federal Communications Commission voted to reopen the debate over how to best preserve an Open Internet. Launching a proceeding seeking “substantive” public comment, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai proposed undoing the only legal basis for network neutrality rules that has survived court challenge. The unreleased Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) proposes to reverse the FCC’s 2015 ruling that the transmission component of broadband Internet access service (BIAS) is a telecommunications service. The NPRM also proposes to 1) return to the FCC’s original classification of mobile broadband Internet access service as a private mobile service; and 2) eliminate the Internet conduct standard created by the 2015 Order. Finally, the NPRM questions the need for the FCC’s so-called “bright-line rules” which prohibit broadband providers from a) blocking access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices; b) impairing or degrading lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices; and c) favoring some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration of any kind—in other words, no "fast lanes." (This rule also bans ISPs from prioritizing content and services of their affiliates.)

Lawmakers rally net neutrality supporters ahead of key FCC vote

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

Democratic lawmakers rallied net neutrality supporters ahead of the Federal Communications Commission’s initial vote to start rolling back the Obama-era regulations.

Are net neutrality supporters wasting their time by filing comments at the FCC?

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

A warning to the hundreds of thousands of people publicly urging the Federal Communications Commission to keep its tough net neutrality rules: You might be wasting your time.

House Commerce Committee Democrats Seek Hearing on FCC Web Issues

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

A quartet of House Commerce Committee Democrats led by ranking member Frank Pallone (D-NJ) have called on the Republican majority to hold a hearing on Federal Communications Commission web site "failures."

How the US can hold Erdogan’s brawling guards accountable — and keep it from happening again

Location:
Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
2

On May 16, a brief but violent altercation erupted outside the home of the Turkish ambassador on Washington’s Embassy Row. At least nine people were injured in the fighting. Video taken at the scene would indicate that most of the injured were protesters standing across the street from the ambassador’s residence. At least some of those involved in causing the injuries were guards for Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Fight for the Future Seeks Net Neutrality Docket Investigation

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Fight for the Future is asking the Federal Communications Commission and state attorneys general to investigate what it says is potential fraud related to the filing of comments in the FCC's network neutrality docket.

Will Pai “Pull A Putin” And Hack the FCC Process? Or Will He Get Over Himself and Start Acting Like The Chairman?

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

In my 20+ years of doing telecommunications policy, I have never seen a Federal Communications Commission Chairman so badly botch a proceeding as Chairman Ajit Pai has managed to do with his efforts to repeal Net Neutrality.

FCC Commissioner Clyburn: “Much rhetoric in [the Open Internet] proceeding is completely divorced from reality.”

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
1

Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Mignon Clyburn’s “fact sheet” that purports to show how FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has reversed his positions on the Open Internet Order between 2014 and today. Clyburn’s fact sheet is misleading, giving a false impression that the chairman’s views have changed in ways that they have not.

Help, John Oliver: How the FCC Is Trying to Trick Us About Net Neutrality

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has a pretty savvy publicity team. The only problem? It isn’t exactly telling you the truth.

Net Neutrality 101: What you need to know to survive the next 6+ months of debate

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

On May 18, the Trump Federal Communications Commission will vote to adopt a final “Notice of Proposed Rulemaking” (NPRM) that will officially begin the effort to repeal the 2015 network neutrality rules and the legal authority upon which they are based — Title II of the Communications Act of 1934.

Flooded with thoughtful net neutrality comments, FCC highlights “mean tweets”

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Widespread support for strong network neutrality rules continues, both from individuals who use the Internet and companies that offer websites and applications over the Internet. But Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has made a point of trumpeting anti-net neutrality sentiment as the FCC begins the process of reclassifying Internet service providers and eliminating net neutrality rules.

John Oliver urges net neutrality supporters to tone down FCC comments

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

“Writing racist things on the internet is not how you win the net neutrality debate,” Oliver said. “It’s how you win the presidency.”

Internet Democracy Is Great … in Theory. Just Ask the FCC

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

The Federal Communications Commission says it wants to hear from you about the future of net neutrality. But in opening its virtual doors to the public, it’s also opened them to spammers and trolls, some of whom might have even managed to knock the FCC’s site offline this past week.

Congress, not John Oliver's 'flash mobs,' must determine FCC policy

Location:
USTelecom, 607 14th Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20005, United States
Recommendation:
3

The Federal communications Commission’s rulemaking process is an important step toward shaping a modern network neutrality framework that doesn’t shackle innovation to a pole erected in the era of black and white films. But ultimately the best place for that debate to be resolved on a permanent basis is through our elected representatives in Congress.

The John Oliver effect: Visualizing public comments (from Trump to expletives) on the FCC's net neutrality rollback

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

In the days following John Oliver's Sunday video on network neutrality, the Federal Communications Commission's public comment filing page has blown up. Indeed, the volume of commentary was over 10 times the amount Oliver inspired over the same number of days in 2014, when his influence was widely credited with encouraging the FCC's decision to reclassify internet service providers under Title II regulations a few months later.

Anti-net neutrality spammers are impersonating real people to flood FCC comments

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

Thousands have posted comments on the Federal Communications Commission’s website in response to a proposed rollback of network neutrality internet protections, weighing in on whether and how to defend the open internet. But many others appeared to have a different point of view.

John Oliver may have helped spur 150,000 comments to FCC on network neutrality

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Nearly 200,000 people have already commented on network neutrality to the Federal Communications Commission — many likely spurred on by HBO's John Oliver.

Statement by FCC CIO on Denial-of-Service Attack on FCC Comment System

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

Beginning on May 7 at midnight, our analysis reveals that the Federal Communications Commission was subject to multiple distributed denial-of-service attacks (DDos).

What a billboard means for your Internet privacy

Location:
Phoenix, AZ, United States
Recommendation:
3

An internet privacy group has taken out a billboard in Phoenix criticizing Sen Jeff Flake (R-AZ) for pushing a bill earlier in 2017 critics say pulls back some federal online privacy rules.

Net neutrality protestors leave messages on doors in FCC chairman's neighborhood

Location:
Arlington, VA, United States
Recommendation:
3

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai unveiled his plans to reverse network neutrality in April, and the proposal is expected to face an initial vote on May 18th. On May 7, protesters from the Protect Our Internet campaign went around Chairman Pai’s neighborhood in Arlington (VA) and distributed door hangers at nearby homes, prompting people to be aware of their neighbor’s efforts to limit internet freedom.

How TV has trivialized our culture and politics

Location:
Fordham University, Bronx, NY, 10458, United States
Recommendation:
3

A Q&A with Lance State, a professor of communications at Fordham University.

You Cannot Encrypt Your Face

Location:
Georgetown Law School, 120 F Street, NW Sarah M. Gewirz Student Center, 12th Floor, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

From the Boston Tea Party to the printing of Common Sense, the ability to dissent—and to do it anonymously—was central to the founding of the United States.

Let’s read between the lines on what the FCC boss told us about his net neutrality plans

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai stressed the importance that net neutrality protections come in the form of “light-touch regulation.” And his public notice leaves it up for tech and telecom companies to debate exactly how that might look.

Hate Speech And The Misnomer Of 'The Marketplace of Ideas'

Location:
University of Wisoconsin, 105 Garfield Ave, Eau Claire, WI, 54701, United States
Recommendation:
3

Racist hate speech on campus has become the de facto litmus test for free speech protections today. But racist hate speech may not be doing what progressive free speech defenders think it is doing.

Public Trust in Government Remains Near Historic Lows as Partisan Attitudes Shift

Location:
Pew Research Center, 1615 L Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

For the first time since George W. Bush’s presidency, Republicans (28%) are more likely than Democrats (15%) to say they can trust the government in Washington to do the right thing just about always or most of the time.

Verizon Accuses Net Neutrality Advocates of Lying to Rile Base

Location:
Verizon Communications, 140 West St, New York, NY, 10007, United States
Recommendation:
3

Network neutrality is under threat and advocacy groups such as Free Press, Fight for the Future and others are pushing to save it. That's not how Verizon, one of the Internet Service Providers hoping for a reversal of Federal Communications Commission rules enabling net neutrality, sees it.

President Trump's attack on open internet imperils democracy

Location:
The Cap Times, 1901 Fish Hatchery Rd, Madison, WI, United States
Recommendation:
3

No act of the recklessly authoritarian Trump Administration poses a greater threat to democratic discourse than the now-announced plan to gut network neutrality rules.

The Free, Open Internet Is Under Threat, and It’s Too Boring for Anyone to Care

Location:
USA, United States
Recommendation:
3

Among the many fragile regulatory frameworks being attacked with sledgehammers by the Trump Administration is “network neutrality,” a very important issue that will dictate how the internet evolves (or doesn’t) for years to come. The problem, though, is that net neutrality is very tough to sell as important to people, because it is one of the most boring topics in the world.

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