Retransmission consent

The Communications Act prohibits cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors from retransmitting commercial television, low power television and radio broadcast signals without first obtaining the broadcaster's consent. This permission is commonly referred to as "retransmission consent" and may involve some compensation from the cable company to the broadcaster for the use of the signal. Alternately, local commercial and noncommercial television broadcast stations may require a cable operator that serves the same market as the broadcaster to carry its signal. A demand for carriage is commonly referred to as "must-carry." If the broadcast station asserts its must-carry rights, the broadcaster cannot demand compensation from the cable operator. While retransmission consent and must-carry are distinct and function separately, they are related in that commercial broadcasters are required to choose once every three years, on a system-by-system basis, whether to obtain carriage or continue carriage by choosing between must carry and retransmission consent. (See http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/cblbdcst.html)

Retransmission Revenue Seen Hitting $7.6B By 2019

Location:
SNL Kagan, One SNL Plaza, Charlottesville, VA, 22902, United States
Recommendation:
1

TV broadcasters’ retransmission consent revenue will come in at $4.3 billion in 2014 and continue to grow at a brisk pace, hitting $5.1 billion in 2015 and $7.6 billion in 2019, according to the latest analysis from SNL Kagan.

The other side of net neutrality

Location:
Concurrent Media Strategies, 2500 Q Street NW, Washington, DC, 20007, United States
Recommendation:
3

Forget fast lanes and slow lanes. Viacom has headed straight for the off-ramp from Phoenix-based cable operator Cable One’s broadband platform. The MTV and Comedy Central parent confirmed that it is blocking online access to its content by Cable One broadband subscribers as part of a pay-TV carriage dispute with the operator that has led to Viacom channels going dark on the system.

FCC Chairman Wheeler Concerned About Online Retrans Blackouts

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

During questioning by Rep Peter Welch (D-VT) in a House Communications Subcommittee Federal Communications Commission oversight hearing, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said he was concerned, and everyone else should be too, about instances where subscriber access to online content was blocked as part of a programming dispute.

Deadlines Set On New Joint Retransmission Rule

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The new Federal Communications Commission rule barring Top 4 TV stations from negotiating retransmission consent deals together in the same market will go into effect June 18.

FCC Trumps Hill On Retransmission Reform Action

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The pay TV industry has scored points in its continuing campaign to reform retransmission consent, both on Capitol Hill and at the Federal Communications Commission -- but any significant additional reforms are more likely to come from the agency than Congress, industry lobbyists say.

House Judiciary Wades Into STELA

Location:
House Judiciary Committee, Independence Avenue and South Capitol Street Rayburn House Office Building -- 2141, Washington, DC, 20003, United States
Recommendation:
2

The House Commerce Committee passed the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act (STELA) on a bipartisan vote, but that doesn't mean the legislation is done in the House.

Block Seeks Limited FCC Retransmission Intervention

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Federal Communications Commission should crack down on larger broadcasters and cable operators alike when they abuse their power by making unreasonable demands during retransmission consent negotiations -- or so says Block Communications, the Toledo, Ohio-based owner of TV stations, daily newspapers and Buckeye Cablevision, in a petition at the agency.

Dish, DirecTV Back STELA Compromise

Location:
House Commerce Committee, Independence Avenue and South Capitol Street, Washington, DC, 20003, United States
Recommendation:
1

Satellite companies Dish and DirecTV said they support a compromise struck by House Commerce Committee members on the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act and urged swift passage.

HR 4572, the STELA Reauthorization Act of 2014

Location:
House Commerce Committee, 45 Independence Ave SW 2123 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

Extension of Retransmission Authority for Distant Signals: The bill reauthorizes the retransmission consent provisions for distant signals for five years, ensuring that 1.5 million subscribers in hard-to-reach areas continue to receive vital broadcast programming.

House telecom panel reaches agreement on TV law

Location:
House Commerce Committee, 45 Independence Ave SW 2123 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
2

The leadership of the House Commerce Committee has reached a bipartisan agreement on an upcoming satellite television bill.

Moonves Pitches FCC's Wheeler On Maintaining Retransmission Regime

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
1

On the eve of the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner in Washington, CBS president and CEO Les Moonves stopped by the Federal Communications Commission to meet with Chairman Tom Wheeler about a variety of issues, including why the FCC should not tinker with retransmission.

Broadcasters Seek Consumer Group Help In Retransmission Fight

Location:
National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), 1771 N Street NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

Broadcasters are hoping to enlist consumer groups in battling cable operators over what broadcaster group TVfreedom.org is calling abusive pay TV practices.

A Broadcaster's Guide To Washington Issues

Location:
Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
2

With so many new regulations and challenges facing television broadcasters, it’s hard to keep track of all the changes. With FCC Watch, an exclusive briefing on some of the major issues at the Federal Communications Commission prepared by David Oxenford and David O'Connor, attorneys in the Washington law offices of Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP.

Analyst Sees Station Mergers Affecting Reverse Compensation

Location:
MoffettNathanson, 1180 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY, 10036, United States
Recommendation:
2

The wave of TV station consolidation that is driven in part to extract larger retransmission payments from cable and satellite operators, might also help broadcasters push back against network demands for reverse retransmission payments.

Aereo’s Supreme Court case balances innovation and copyright

Location:
Washington Post, 1150 15th St NW, Washington, DC, 20071, United States
Recommendation:
2

At the Supreme Court, some observers have noted, the Justices seemed flummoxed by the case of Aereo, a company that pulls network TV broadcasts off the airwaves and streams it to online users for a monthly fee. That is not because the court’s jurists are hopelessly incapable of considering its business model. It is because taking decades-old law and applying it to new technological reality is hard. The principles at stake, however, are much simpler.

The Aereo case is being decided by people who call iCloud ‘the iCloud.’ Yes, really.

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
1

In the end, the Supreme Court's ideal frame of reference was the phonograph. The fact that their first instinct was to turn to an invention created 137 years ago speaks gigabytes for how well the Justices approach the day's most important technology cases. It's easy to poke fun at the bench.

The Supreme Court struggles to find an analogy for Aereo

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Supreme Court pondered whether or not Aereo is engaged in the impermissible public performance of copyrighted material or whether it was doing, well something else.

Everything you need to know about Aereo, the Supreme Court and the future of TV

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

Depending on the outcome of the Aereo case, the battle could either solidify TV networks' grip over their content or throw the doors open to a future where consumers will be able to get traditional, over-the-air programming over the Internet instead.

“Free to air” really means that broadcasters have no case

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
2

In the Aereo case, it is very clear what is happening: broadcasters are seeking to keep a rent stream going that was essentially handed to them historically by license agreements with the government.

At Stake in the Aereo Case Is How We Watch TV

Location:
New York Times, 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, NY, 10018, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Aereo case has technology aficionados and media reporters in a tizzy, partly because it has a little bit of everything: legacy media hanging on to cherished business models, an insurgent with a crafty workaround and perhaps most important, the first big test at the Supreme Court of who owns and has rights to things that are stored in the cloud.

An Aereo Court Victory Could Be More Noise Than Signal

Location:
Wall Street Journal, 1211 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY, 10036, United States
Recommendation:
2

Aereo is having its much-trumpeted day in court. But even if it wins, broadcasters' immediate reactions could come as more of a whisper.

Supreme Court Hears Arguments in Aereo Case

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

The Supreme Court seemed to have conflicting impulses in considering a request from television broadcasters to shut down Aereo, an Internet start-up that the broadcasters say hreatens the economic viability of their businesses.

In Aereo case, Supreme Court to weigh public (performance) vs. private

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments in the most important copyright case of the year, and possibly the most important one since it took up file-sharing piracy in MGM vs. Grokster.

Aereo analysis: Cloud computing at a crossroads

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

The question of whether online broadcast television is to remain in the hands of a stodgy industry that once declared the VCR the enemy is being put directly before the Supreme Court.

What happens if broadcasters lose the Aereo case?

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

Should Aereo win the right to retransmit the over-the-air signals of television broadcasters, other operators could use similar technologies to also avoid paying the retransmission fees, and that, say some legal experts, could undermine the entire broadcast business model.

Why the Supreme Court might pull the plug on Aereo

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
3

Aereo will finally plead its case to the nine US Supreme Court justices who will determine its fate. Since the enactment of the Copyright Act of 1976, retransmitters of broadcast signals have been required to first obtain permission from the broadcasters -- who own copyrights to much of the programming encoded therein.

Aereo Case Will Shape TV’s Future

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
2

More and more, many of the splashy business victories are going to companies that find a way to put a new skin on things that already exist. Since 2012, Chet Kanojia has been building a business, backed by the media mogul Barry Diller, with ambitions to join that cohort.

Aereo's TV Internet Broadcasts Are a Simple Case of Piracy

Location:
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman, 2300 N Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20037, United States
Recommendation:
2

Aereo is a two-year-old company that picks up television signals and sends them to the Internet-connected devices of Aereo subscribers, all without permission from or payment to the broadcasters who provide the programming. In copyright parlance, such use of broadcast signals is called unlicensed public performance. In plain English, it's piracy.

7 Ways the Feds Can Make a Comcast-Time Warner Merger Less Terrible

Recommendation:
2

If the Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger must go through, the Federal Communications Commission should impose the seven conditions on the deal ...

Supreme Court Allows Feds To Argue In Aereo Case Next Week

Location:
Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), One First Street, NE, Washington, DC, United States
Recommendation:
2

The Supreme Court has decided to let the Solicitor General’s office participate in the one-hour oral arguments session between Aereo and television broadcasters.

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