Nicol Turner-Lee

Addressing racial bias in the online economy

Location:
Brookings, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

The online economy has not resolved the issue of race-based ad targeting.

Why the new administration should care about technology access for all

Location:
Brookings, 1775 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
3

A progressive technology agenda was promoted and executed over the last eight years, and in spite of party differences, the new Trump Administration might want to adopt these actions.

Don’t Forget About High-Speed Broadband

Location:
Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council, 3636 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC, 20010, United States
Recommendation:
2

More than 80 percent of American adults use the Internet, a number that will continue to increase alongside consumer demand for broadband-enabled devices and applications. Given this trend, the US should expand its current definition of physical infrastructure beyond local and national water mains, electrical grids, roads, bridges and highways to include high-speed broadband.

Happy 5th Anniversary, National Broadband Plan! Progress and New Questions in the Plan’s Review.

Location:
Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council, 3636 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC, 20010, United States
Recommendation:
2

In March, the nation celebrated the fifth anniversary of the National Broadband Plan, a heralded assignment by the Federal Communications Commission to develop a comprehensive blueprint for technology advancement, broadband deployment, and broadband adoption.

E-Rate 2.0: Can America Win the Race to Capacity?

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Reducing disparities in educational achievement and narrowing the skills gap are two important concerns among policymakers and practitioners alike. Education reform is essential to achieving these goals, especially for African American and Latino students who continue to trail their White counterparts in high school and college graduation rates. While debates in this area have primarily focused on strategies for requiring more in-school hours or a set of standard core competencies, a new variable has been added to the equation – faster, more efficient high-speed broadband networks in our nation’s schools and libraries.

The Social Cost of Wireless Taxation: Wireless Taxation and its Consequences for Minorities and the Poor

Location:
Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 1090 Vermont Ave., NW, Washington, DC, 20005-4928, United States
Recommendation:
2

This paper presents an argument for why state and local governments should opt for comprehensive reform of taxes against wireless services, digital goods, and digital services and shares recent data on minority mobile broadband use.

Does Place Really Matter? Broadband Availability, Race and Income

Location:
Chicago, IL, United States
Recommendation:
3

New research assessing broadband availability mapping data released by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). The study includes analyses of wireline and wireless access in high minority, low-income communities in three locations -- South Carolina, Chicago and Los Angeles.

The Challenge of Increasing Civic Engagement in the Digital Age

Recommendation:
2

While the example of the 2008 presidential election foreshadows the role of the Internet in our democracy, addressing the factors that create and maintain stratification on the web is the main focus of this essay. Turner-Lee argues that unequal access to the Internet affects civic engagement when groups are underrepresented, or on the periphery of online activity.

Lower-Income and Less Educated Still Face Broad Digital Divide

Location:
Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 1090 Vermont Ave., NW, Washington, DC, 20005-4928, United States
Recommendation:
3

More than 75% of Americans, across racial and ethnic groups, now use the Internet on a regular basis. Seventy-nine percent of Whites, 69% of African Americans, 59% of Hispanics, and more than 83% of other racial and ethnic minorities, including Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, Native Americans, and multiracial Americans are now online.

Joint Center Supports Clearinghouse, Cautions Against Locking Some Out

Recommendation:
2

The heart of the broadband clearinghouse should be an emphasis on how unserved and underserved communities adopt and utilize broadband.