Morning Consult

Pluralities of Democrats and Republicans Want Congress to Focus on Data Protection

Many US voters in a recent Morning Consult/Politico poll, including pluralities of both Democrats and Republicans, said they’d like to see the next Congress make it a top priority to pass measures that better protect consumer data, outweighing other more partisan concerns such as efforts to codify network neutrality and addressing allegations of political bias and censorship on social media.

Poll: Majority blames both President Trump and media for dividing country

A new Politico/Morning Consult poll conducted over the past fractious, violent week shows a majority of voters think that President Donald Trump has done more to divide the country than unite it since he took office in 2017 — but that the national news media are even worse. Just 3 in 10 voters, 30 percent, said President Trump has done more to unite the country, compared with 56 percent who said he’s done more to divide it. Even more voters, 64 percent, said the media have done more to divide the country, while only 17 percent say they have done more to unite it. 

Net Neutrality Important to Democratic Voters — but Not to Democratic Campaigns

A new Morning Consult/Politico survey found 59 percent of self-identified Democratic voters considered support for network neutrality to be a somewhat or very important factor when deciding which candidate to support during the midterm elections — a figure that was unchanged from polling conducted in May.

Democrats’ Net Neutrality Push Resonates With Base, Poll Shows

Democratic voters are receptive to the party’s efforts to use the network neutrality debate as a way to energize the base heading into the November midterms, according to Morning Consult/Politico polling. The most recent survey — conducted May 17-19 among 1,990 registered voters nationwide — found that 59 percent of Democratic respondents said a candidate’s support for the net neutrality rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission in 2015 was somewhat or very important when deciding whom to vote for in the midterms, compared to 51 percent of respondents overall.