Congressional Budget Office

CBO Scores the Secure and Trusted Communications Networks Act of 219

The Secure and Trusted Communications Networks Act of 2019 (HR 4998) would establish a program, administered by the Federal Communications Commission, to reimburse certain US communications providers for the cost of removing and replacing equipment or services made or provided by entities, including certain companies based in China, that are deemed to pose a national security risk. The act would prohibit recipients of FCC subsidies from using those funds to purchase, rent, lease, or otherwise obtain communications equipment or services that could threaten national security.

CBO Scores the Broadband DATA Act

The Broadband DATA Act (HR 4229) would require the Federal Communications Commission to collect detailed data twice a year on the availability of broadband Internet access services. That data would be reported by providers of those broadband services. Under the act, the FCC would establish and maintain a comprehensive database and create detailed and publicly available broadband coverage maps. The act also would require the FCC to develop processes for any person or entity to submit broadband availability data to verify or challenge the FCC’s database or maps.

CBO Scores Network Security Information Sharing Act of 2019

The Network Security Information Sharing Act (HR 4461) would require the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to mitigate cybersecurity threats to suppliers of telecommunications services and equipment. Under the bill, the DHS would establish a program office to share information with trusted participants in the telecommunications industry about efforts by adversaries to embed malicious software into communications equipment purchased by American companies.

CBO Scores the Developing Innovation and Growing the Internet of Things Act

The Developing Innovation and Growing the Internet of Things Act (S. 1611) would require the Department of Commerce (DOC) to convene a federal interagency working group to report to the Congress on the Internet of things (IoT). The group would be required to identify laws and regulations that inhibit or promote IoT deployment, examine current and future federal IoT use, and recommend federal IoT security measures. Also under S.

CBO Scores the DOTGOV Online Trust in Government Act

The DOTGOV Online Trust in Government Act (S 2749) would codify the process through which federal and nonfederal entities request internet domain names specifically for governmental users (i.e. domain names ending in .gov). The bill would transfer the responsibility for overseeing the current process from the General Services Administration (GSA) to the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA). The bill also would permit state and local entities to apply for homeland security grants to help fund the costs of transitioning to those governmental domain names.

CBO Scores the National Commission on Online Platforms and Homeland Security Act

The National Commission on Online Platforms and Homeland Security Act (HR 4782) would require the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to research how online platforms may be used to facilitate acts of terrorism. On the basis of information from DHS regarding the costs of similar research efforts, CBO estimates implementing that provision would cost $4 million. The bill also would establish a national commission to study how entities have used social media and other online platforms to threaten US national security.

CBO Scores Broadband DATA Act

The Broadband Deployment Accuracy and Technological Availability Act (S. 1822) would require the Federal Communications Commission to collect detailed data twice a year on the availability of broadband internet access services. That data would be reported by providers of those broadband services. Under the bill, the FCC would establish and maintain a comprehensive database and create detailed and publicly available broadband coverage maps.

CBO Scores the Secure 5G And Beyond Act

The Secure 5G and Beyond Act of 2019 (S. 893) would require the President, acting through the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) and other federal agencies, to develop and submit to the Congress a strategy to ensure the security of 5G and future generations wireless communications systems and infrastructure owned by the US and its allies. Among various other requirements, the NTIA would have to assess potential security threats to American 5G systems and infrastructure and analyze how competitive American 5G manufacturers and suppliers are globally.