June 7, 2010 (Comcast-NBC Universal hearing in LA Today)

BENTON'S COMMUNICATIONS-RELATED HEADLINES for MONDAY, JUNE 7, 2010

Today's DC agenda is in LA, talkin' Comcast-NBC-GE http://bit.ly/axXk3c (and see below for preview)


AGENDA
   Witness list for Los Angeles Comcast - NBC Universal hearing shaping up
   FCC's Consumer Advisory Committee to Meet June 30

BROADBAND/INTERNET
   Congressional Forecast: Telecom Policy Storm Brewing
   Department of Commerce Inspector General Report to Congress
   Sen Snowe pans FCC plan on broadband reclassification
   FCC Seeks Comment on Spectrum Use
   United States' Broadband Goals: Managing 'Spillover Effects' to Increase Availability, Adoption and Investment
   More Free Data
   Levin Sees Spectrum Return Reality

PRIVACY
   Google to hand over intercepted data
   IAB: Boucher Bill Strikes At 'Heart And Soul Of Today's Internet Offerings'
   Is your privacy secure online? There's no way to tell

WIRELESS
   India's Reliance in Informal Talks With AT&T
   AT&T Wireless Shift Promises Boon to Cable
   AT&T's Wireless Pricing Shift Will Test Behavior
   AT&T tiered data plan and questions about regulatory oversight
   Apple and Google square off
   How to Get Rejected from the App Store

JOURNALISM
   As 'new media' proliferate, does government have a role?

HEALTH
   Hooked on Gadgets, and Paying a Mental Price
   Harnessing the Power of Information to Improve Health

KIDS AND MEDIA
   Youth Safety on a Living Internet
   FCC Proposes Fine Against Fox TV Over 'American Dad'

NEWS FROM THE WHITE HOUSE
   Subra Suresh Nominated for National Science Foundation Post
   The National Summit of Rural America: A Dialogue of Renewing Promise

MORE ONLINE
   Chicago Public TV Station cuts jobs as part of effort to save $3M
   US Seeks To Define Rules On Cyberwar

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AGENDA

LA HEARING ON COMCAST DEAL
[SOURCE: Los Angeles Times, AUTHOR: Joe Flint]
The witness list for the House Judiciary Committee's hearing to be held Monday in Los Angeles about the Comcast-NBC Universal deal is likely to include a mix of industry executives and academics, many of whom will raise concerns about the combination of the cable giant and the programming behemoth. Although the committee chair is Rep. John Conyers (D-MI.) and he will be overseeing the hearing, the driving force behind is it Rep Maxine Waters (D-CA). Rep Waters, who was particularly tough on NBC Universal about diversity in its prime-time programming during a hearing about the deal back in February, pushed Monday's event. Among potential witnesses are producer Suzanne de Passe, Alex Nogales of the National Hispanic Media Coalition; writer and producer Reggie Hudlin, a former senior executive at BET who was also an executive producer of Cartoon Network's "The Boondocks" and more recently has directed episodes of ABC's "Modern Family" and NBC's "The Office;" Frank Washington, chairman of Tower of Babel, which owns KBTV-TV Sacramento, a television station that Comcast carries on its cable systems there; Will Griffin, a music and cable entrepreneur; Sam Kang of the Greenlining Institute, a liberal think tank, is set to appear; media watchdog Stanley Washington, chief executive of the National Coalition of African American Owned Media.
benton.org/node/36617 | Los Angeles Times
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BROADBAND/INTERNET

TELECOM POLICY STORM BREWING
[SOURCE: CongressDaily, AUTHOR: David Hatch]
Four influential Democrats announced plans late last month to reopen the 1934 Communications Act for the first time in 14 years, immediately igniting a frenzy in Washington. The last time Congress ventured down this path, in 2006, an open battle ensued over a massive bill that swelled with pet provisions; the struggle finally ended amid rancor and finger-pointing. Along the way, telecom firms contributed more than $6 million to lawmakers and spent nearly $110 million on lobbying during the 2006 election cycle, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Telecom experts say the stage is being set for a legislative encore that could stretch well beyond 2011 and is poised to bring back the political daggers and big-money lobbying. "This basically will pick up where Congress left off in 2006," a veteran lobbyist said.
benton.org/node/36609 | CongressDaily
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IG REPORT TO CONGRESS
[SOURCE: Department of Commerce, AUTHOR: Todd Zinser]
The Department of Commerce's Office of Inspector General identified several concerns in the National Telecommunications and Information Administration's broadband stimulus (Broadband Technology Opportunities Program -- BTOP) pre-award process and expressed concern with whether NTIA has identified and obtained needed resources to execute a grant program of BTOP's magnitude in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's timeframe.
BTOP's size and complexity have significantly challenged NTIA. NTIA's program staffing levels appear to be insufficient to simultaneously perform the necessary first- and second-round award activities.
The office relies heavily on a few key individuals and personnel from other agencies to carry out the program's operations.
NTIA's inconsistent documentation of important information such as policies, procedures, staff roles, and key management decisions could lead to inefficiency and miscommunication.
The first round of BTOP grant application processing exposed several problems with the online grant intake system, which affected efficiency and users' experiences.
A shortage of volunteer peer reviewers meant that application review for the first round was delayed. As NTIA manages the second-round process and handles post-award activities for first-round grant recipients, it must be careful to obtain enough reviewers for the workload.
NTIA will need to closely monitor grantees during post-award operations to ensure they comply with the National Environmental Policy Act.
According to the Act, BTOP must spend all of its $4.7 billion in grant funding by September 30, 2010. Over the next 6 months, NTIA must address several challenges as it concurrently monitors first-round grant awards and issues new awards. Challenges include (1) coordinating with other federal organizations supporting contract and grants management and (2) overseeing contractors implementing BTOP. In the next semiannual period, we will issue a report detailing our concerns with BTOP's program management and pre-award process.
benton.org/node/36610 | Department of Commerce
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SNOWE PANS FCC
[SOURCE: The Hill, AUTHOR: Sara Jerome]
Sen Olympia Snowe (R-Maine), the most vocal network neutrality supporter among GOP senators, has joined her colleagues in urging Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski not to change the regulatory classification of broadband service. Sen Snowe said she supports the FCC's goal of keeping the Internet open and expanding broadband to all Americans, but that she sees "significant drawbacks" in Genachowski's proposal to change broadband's regulatory status. She said Genachowski's effort could create uncertainty that would "hamper or delay investment in much-needed broadband." Sen Snowe has repeatedly introduced network neutrality legislation designed to rein in how cable and phone companies can treat the traffic that rides over their networks. But she indicated she strongly opposes the reclassification effort, and said congressional action to streamline broadband policies is preferable to Genachowski's plan. Sen Snowe warned that putting broadband services under Title II of the 1934 Communications Act would place new technologies under regulatory burdens designed decades before the Internet was launched. "Title II includes numerous prescriptive regulatory obligations — close to 50 different sections — many of which were created in 1934 and do not properly capture technological advancements," Sen Snowe said. She said she supports the calls by the chairmen of key congressional committees to start work on updating the Communications Act.
benton.org/node/36615 | Hill, The | B&C
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FCC REQUESTS INFORMATION ON USE OF 1675-1710 MHz BAND
[SOURCE: Federal Communications Commission, AUTHOR: ]
The National Broadband Plan recommends that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) should make 500 megahertz of spectrum available for broadband use within the next 10 years, including 300 megahertz between 225 MHz and 3.7 GHz for mobile use in the next five years. The Office of Engineering and Technology has engaged in discussions with the Office of Spectrum Management, National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), to begin examining various frequency bands that may be suitable for mobile broadband use. NTIA has preliminarily identified the 1675-1710 MHz band for such use and is examining the impact on its incumbent federal users. By this Public Notice, we seek information to help us better comprehend the current use of the 1675-1710 MHz band by non-federal entities and better understand its potential utility for broadband. The 1675-1710 MHz band is allocated on a co-primary basis for federal and non-federal use for the Meteorological Aids Service and the Meteorological Satellite Service (Space-to-earth). Specifically, this band is used for downlinks from certain weather satellites and radiosondes (weather balloons) that are administered by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA provides these services for weather forecasting, tracking of hurricanes and other storms, prediction of flooding and drought conditions, and warning against other hazards to life and property. The FCC seeks comment on the extent to which and manner in which non-federal users directly access federally authorized Meteorological Satellite Service space station downlink transmissions. The FCC also seeks comment on the extent to which non-federal users directly access transmissions from radiosondes. Also, it may be feasible for radiosondes to operate using substantially less bandwidth than they currently do, freeing spectrum for other uses, or for them to use an alternative technology or relocate to other spectrum. Comments are due June 28, 2010.
benton.org/node/36613 | Federal Communications Commission
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BROADBAND PLAN RESEARCH
[SOURCE: National Exchange Carrier Association, AUTHOR: Victor Glass]
NECA and Princeton Edge Lab released a paper of case studies, called network scenarios, to prompt an exchange of ideas about systematic approaches and the science needed for achieving the policy objectives in the Federal Communications Commission's National Broadband Plan: universal broadband availability, high adoption rates, and efficient and sustainable investment in infrastructure. The scenarios highlight the pervasiveness and importance of spillover effects where an individual participant in the broadband market can alter the efficiency and value proposition of the entire U.S. broadband network. The paper also highlights the range of further research and data collection necessary to understand critical issues such as two-sided cost recovery, usage-based pricing, and the dynamics across the divide between "pipe" providers and content providers.
benton.org/node/36601 | National Exchange Carrier Association
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MORE FREE DATA
[SOURCE: Federal Communications Commission, AUTHOR: John Horrigan]
On June 4, the Federal Communications Commission released the raw dataset that was the basis for two recently released reports. One, released on May 26, was on bill shock and early termination fees. It is entitled "Americans' perspectives on early termination fees and bill shock." The second report, released earlier this week, is entitled "Americans' perspectives on online connection speeds for home and mobile devices." The survey that was the basis for these reports covered a lot of ground, and the two reports we recently released did not cover all of it. In the coming weeks and months, the FCC will release findings analyzing other questions from this survey. For that reason, the data released today does not include all data from the April-May 2010 survey, but data only on those questions analyzed in the two reports.
benton.org/node/36612 | Federal Communications Commission | raw data | questionaire
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PRIVACY

GOOGLE IN DATA DEAL
[SOURCE: Financial Times, AUTHOR: Maija Palmer, Lionel Barber]
Google will begin handing over to European regulators the rogue data it intercepted from private WiFi Internet connections within the next two days, in an effort to defuse growing controversy over its latest privacy blunder. Eric Schmidt, chief executive, said the world's largest Internet company would hand over information initially to the German, French and Spanish data protection authorities. Germany is considering a criminal investigation into the practice. Google faced a stand-off with Hamburg privacy authorities last week over whether it would be legal to hand over the rogue data. It now appears willing to reach a compromise. The company will also publish the results of an external audit into the practice, in which cars photographing streets for Google's Street View service ended up also collecting snippets of personal information from unsecured WiFi networks.
benton.org/node/36627 | Financial Times
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PRIVACY BILL
[SOURCE: MediaPost, AUTHOR: Wendy Davis]
Potential privacy legislation being floated by Re. Rick Boucher (D-VA) "would fundamentally change online information and online advertising practices to the detriment of consumers," the Interactive Advertising Bureau said June 4 in written comments to lawmakers. "We believe that self-regulation, which is inherently more flexible and better suited to govern a dynamic environment than legislation, is the best approach to help ensure that consumers receive transparency and choice online," the IAB wrote to Reps Boucher and Cliff Stearns (R-FL). The IAB sent the letter in response to draft privacy legislation, circulated last month by Boucher, that would require ad networks that track people to obtain users' consent. The proposal specifically calls for opt-in consent unless companies notify consumers via an icon and also allow people to view and edit their profiles. (Some ad companies, including Google, Yahoo and BlueKai, already allow users to access and revise their profiles.) The IAB objected to that idea, arguing that companies should be able to target users by default, without moving to a system that allows consumers to manage their profiles. "Requiring consumers to opt-in to transfers to third parties would drastically reduce the free flow of information that is the heart and soul of today's Internet offerings," the group writes.
benton.org/node/36608 | MediaPost
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ONLINE PRIVACY
[SOURCE: Los Angeles Times, AUTHOR: Michael Hiltzik]
[Commentary] While you think you're protecting your personal information, your identity is leaking out to sites you don't even know about in ways you can't possibly imagine. Because Facebook earns money from business partners thirsting for knowledge about its users, "Facebook's incentives will always be to expose as much personal information as it can," says Marc Rotenberg, EPIC's director. He says the answer is regulation to require that users opt in to every disclosure of personal information, rather than letting the sites expose the data unless the user opts out. Remember the New Yorker cartoon of a dog at a computer remarking, "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog"? That was in 1993. In 2010, lots of people would know he's a dog, what breed he is, who his owners are, where they live, and what they bought each other for Christmas. But he wouldn't know they knew. And that's where the danger lies.
benton.org/node/36616 | Los Angeles Times
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WIRELESS

AT&T AND RELIANCE
[SOURCE: Wall Street Journal, AUTHOR: Amol Sharma, Anupreeta Das, Spencer Ante]
Apparently, India's Reliance Communications and AT&T have sounded out each other's interest about a potential transaction in which AT&T would take a significant minority stake in the Indian cellphone company. Reliance, which is backed by billionaire Anil Ambani, said on Sunday its board has approved the sale of up to a 26% equity stake in the firm to raise cash for debt reduction and network upgrades. The Indian company, the nation's second-largest wireless carrier with 105 million subscribers and a market capitalization around $7.4 billion, has been in stake sale talks with Abu Dhabi-based Etisalat Emirates Telecommunications Corp. for about two months but is now courting other suitors including AT&T and other foreign telecom firms. AT&T, the second largest U.S. cellphone company, with 87 million subscribers, is looking at international expansion as the domestic market saturates, sapping future growth potential. India is a particularly attractive target, with over 600 million wireless customers already and carriers adding 17 million new ones per month.
benton.org/node/36626 | Wall Street Journal
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AT&T AND CABLE
[SOURCE: Wall Street Journal, AUTHOR: Nat Worden]
AT&T's decision to shift its wireless-data pricing to a usage-based model may have upset lovers of mobile media, but it is music to the ears of cable executives. The move away from unlimited Internet-data plans by the second-largest U.S. wireless carrier after Verizon Wireless could push more customers to watch videos and stream music through their wireline-broadband connection at home—an area dominated by cable operators—rather than through wireless cellular networks. In addition, even though wireline networks don't suffer from the congestion issues that have plagued wireless carriers, AT&T's move may prompt cable operators to revisit usage-based pricing as online video grows and broadband replaces TV service as the industry's most essential product for U.S. consumers. The cable industry's efforts on usage-based pricing have so far been forestalled by public criticism from lawmakers and consumer groups, but if the wireless industry succeeds in establishing the model, that could set a precedent for wireline operators to follow.
benton.org/node/36625 | Wall Street Journal
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NEW WIRELESS BROADBAND BEHAVIOR?
[SOURCE: Wall Street Journal, AUTHOR: Spencer Ante]
AT&T's shift toward charging wireless subscribers based on the amount of data they use is expected to be an important test of consumer behavior in the technology industry's fastest-growing arena. In announcing its decision to stop selling unlimited Internet data plans, AT&T, the No. 2 U.S. wireless carrier by subscribers, said the new policy could lower prices for most users of mobile devices and encourage them to make wider use of mobile Internet services. But developers of mobile-device software worry that the monthly usage limits in AT&T's new plans could prompt consumers to fret about exceeding their data allotments each time they consider downloading a new game or firing up an application. Such hesitance could dim the growth prospects of the wireless-application market just as it is getting off the ground.
benton.org/node/36624 | Wall Street Journal
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OVERSIGHT OF WIRELESS DATA PLANS
[SOURCE: Washington Post, AUTHOR: Cecilia Kang]
There's lots of interest in Washington about consumer billing practices. There are also questions about the Federal Communications Commission's push for better authority to regulate broadband services that could affect the wireless mobile broadband industry. Rebecca Arbogast, a tech policy analyst at Stifel Nicolaus, said she believes the FCC will continue to allow wireless providers to experiment with different business models, including tiered pricing like that announced by AT&T. The FCC has said it is debating whether to include wireless services in its push to redefine broadband as a telecommunications service. The biggest concern by investors is that the move would -- particularly down the road -- lead to price regulation of broadband and a requirement for network operators to share their Internet lines with competitors. Regulators will like how AT&T's plan allows for a lower entry point for Internet users and is designed to clearly inform users when they go over their allotted amount of data for the month, Arbogast said. But she noted that such pricing models would get greater scrutiny for broadband providers who also produce content. Time Warner Cable scrapped tiered pricing plans after pressure by public interest groups and lawmakers who feared those that models would allow the broadband and cable company to favor its own content.
benton.org/node/36623 | Washington Post | David Pogue | Rob Pegoraro
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APPLE AND GOOGLE
[SOURCE: USAToday, AUTHOR: Jefferson Graham]
How times have changed. What was once mainly a competition between Microsoft and Apple for the hearts and wallets of desktop and laptop users has morphed into a battle for supremacy in burgeoning smartphones and tablet computers. And onetime chum Google is shaping up as Apple's leading rival. Microsoft is mostly an also-ran in those markets, certainly next to Apple, Google and, in the case of phones, BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion.
Smartphones. Android has been out for less than two years, yet in the first quarter edged out the iPhone for second place in smartphone sales after market-leading BlackBerry, according to market research firm the NPD Group. Market share is down 12% for phones based on Microsoft's Windows Mobile software, which is in the process of its own total overhaul later this year.
Tablets. Apple expanded beyond traditional computers with the iPad touch-screen tablet that is taking the world by storm. Meanwhile, Google's Android and Chrome will power a series of tablets and netbook computers later in the year. Microsoft has touted tablets for years, but its pen- or stylus-based machines haven't even sniffed the kind of mass-market success Apple is generating with the iPad. At last week's Wall Street Journal All Things D conference, Jobs suggested that tablets will ultimately replace more traditional desktop computers and laptops, though how soon and to what extent remains to be seen.
TV/media viewing. Google recently announced Google TV, a new initiative to bring the Internet to the television. It is working with companies such as Sony and Logitech on new TVs, Blu-ray players and set-top boxes that will open up websites on your TV screen as seamlessly as TV channels. To date, no product in the category (think Boxee, Roku, TiVo) has seen huge numbers, and that includes Apple TV. Microsoft introduced an "extender" product a few years ago to run PC video on TVs, but it never took off.
Advertising. Mobile advertising is shaping up as a new battleground. Google dominates mobile advertising with its AdWords subsidiary and recent $750 million purchase of AdMob, a company that delivers ads to mobile customers. Apple, which had bid for AdMob, purchased smaller firm Quattro Wireless and recently announced the formation of a new unit, iAds, to compete with Google.
benton.org/node/36622 | USAToday
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APP STORE REJECTS
[SOURCE: InfoWorld, AUTHOR: Neil McAllister]
It seems as if a week doesn't pass without a new story of some app being rejected from Apple's iPhone App Store. Should developers really be surprised? Steve Jobs never wanted third-party developers tinkering with his platform in the first place -- he thought Safari-based Web apps would be enough. Little wonder, then, that when Apple launched the App Store in 2008, it was under strict conditions. Still, it'd be nice for Apple to make those conditions clear. Apple has been tinkering with the language of its iPhone SDK license agreement lately, but that hasn't done much to clarify the rules -- unless you're Adobe. For everyone else, the App Store's requirements seem as vague and capricious as ever. here are a few things you can do to get you booted off the App Store: 1) Write lousy code. 2) Duplicate Apple's software. 3) Get in the way. 4) Execute interpreted code. 5) Use too much bandwidth. 6) Include "objectionable" content. 7) Use Apple's APIs (without permission). 8) Use someone else's stuff. 9) Don't do enough. 10) Design your own user interface. 11) Use graphics Apple doesn't like. 12) Put photos on your desk.
benton.org/node/36604 | InfoWorld
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JOURNALISM

NEW MEDIA AND GOVERNMENT
[SOURCE: The Christian Science Monitor, AUTHOR: Gloria Goodale]
The tension between government and the so-called fourth estate, or the news media, is at the heart of a mounting war of words in the blogosphere as well as in print and broadcast over when, where, why and how lawmakers should interact - some say meddle - with today's swiftly changing news environment. As traditional print and broadcast outlets have continued to dwindle at historic rates and so-called "new media" such as blogs and web-only news sites proliferate, the FTC has convened a task force on how government "can help," with a series of public input meetings, ending June 15. At the same time, in May, Michigan Senator Bruce Patterson introduced a bill to create a state registry for journalists, which he hopes would give the public a means for verifying reporter's qualifications and credentials. The outcry over both has been swift and pointed.
benton.org/node/36620 | Christian Science Monitor, The
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HEALTH

DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION
[SOURCE: New York Times, AUTHOR: Matt Richtel]
Scientists say juggling e-mail, phone calls and other incoming information can change how people think and behave. They say our ability to focus is being undermined by bursts of information. These play to a primitive impulse to respond to immediate opportunities and threats. The stimulation provokes excitement — a dopamine squirt — that researchers say can be addictive. In its absence, people feel bored. The resulting distractions can have deadly consequences, as when cellphone-wielding drivers and train engineers cause wrecks. And for millions of people like Mr. Campbell, these urges can inflict nicks and cuts on creativity and deep thought, interrupting work and family life. While many people say multitasking makes them more productive, research shows otherwise. Heavy multitaskers actually have more trouble focusing and shutting out irrelevant information, scientists say, and they experience more stress. And scientists are discovering that even after the multitasking ends, fractured thinking and lack of focus persist. In other words, this is also your brain off computers.
benton.org/node/36628 | New York Times | Impatience and Forgetfulness | New York Times/CBS News poll
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POWER OF INFORMATION TO IMPROVE HEALTH
[SOURCE: The White House, AUTHOR: Todd Park, Aman Bhandari]
On June 2, we launched a vital new HHS Open Government effort: The Community Health Data Initiative (CHDI). Joined by almost 700 people in person and online, the Initiative was publicly launched by HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius along with Deputy Secretary Bill Corr, Institute of Medicine President Harvey Fineberg, and White House CTO Aneesh Chopra at a forum held at the National Academy of Sciences. The Community Health Data Initiative is an incredibly exciting new public-private collaboration that is encouraging innovators to utilize data made publicly available by HHS to develop applications that will help raise awareness of community health performance, spark action to improve performance, and empower individuals and communities to make informed choices about their health. This initiative has its roots in a brainstorming session of public and private sector innovators held on March 11 by the Institute of Medicine and HHS. The objective of the March session was to explore what could be done with HHS's vast stores of community health data - e.g., smoking rates, obesity rates, access to healthy food, utilization of medical services, etc. If HHS made such data easily accessible by the public, would innovators be interested in developing creative new uses for it that could benefit the public? The answer was a resounding yes, so we went to work. Innovators from the worlds of business, technology, academia, and community advocacy identified many areas where exciting new applications to improve health could be developed.
benton.org/node/36605 | White House, The
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KIDS AND MEDIA

YOUTH ONLINE SAFETY
[SOURCE: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, AUTHOR: Online Safety and Technology Working Group]
The Online Safety and Technology Working Group has submitted a report and many recommendations to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration after evaluating:
The status of industry efforts to promote online safety through educational efforts, parental control technology, blocking and filtering software, age-appropriate labels for content or other technologies or initiatives designed to promote a safe online environment for children;
The status of industry efforts to promote online safety among providers of electronic communications services and remote computing services by reporting apparent child pornography, including any obstacles to such reporting;
The practices of electronic communications service providers and remote computing service providers related to record retention in connection with crimes against children; and
The development of technologies to help parents shield their children from inappropriate material on the Internet.
The OSTWG has attempted to offer recommendations that will stand the test of time by stressing that lawmakers, government, and risk-prevention practitioners rely heavily on the research, as it unfolds, to get an accurate picture of what needs to be addressed when it is being addressed. This is in no way dissimilar to the approach policymakers have taken with our nation's longest living laws and policies, which continue to stand up to historical, behavioral, and technological change.
benton.org/node/36611 | National Telecommunications and Information Administration | Washington Post | The Hill
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FINE FOR 'AMERICAN DAD'?
[SOURCE: Wall Street Journal, AUTHOR: Amy Schatz]
The Federal Communications Commission proposed a $25,000 fine against Fox Television Stations Thursday for not providing information about an indecency complaint involving the animated TV show "American Dad." The FCC said Fox officials repeatedly failed to provide enough information about a Jan. 3 episode of "American Dad," which featured scenes that suggested a character performed a sexual act on a horse. The FCC said it received more than 100,000 indecency complaints about the show. Two TV watchdog groups, the Parents Television Council and the American Family Association, urged their members to file complaints about the episode shortly after it aired. The proposed fine by the FCC doesn't mean the agency will ultimately fine Fox stations for broadcasting the show, although it does suggest that the agency is actively looking into the complaint.
benton.org/node/36618 | Wall Street Journal
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