National Broadband Plan dissenters include small telcos

Despite its complexity, the National Broadband Plan is still just that -- a plan. Before its recommendations can come to pass, more than 40 Federal Communications Commission proceedings will need to occur and Congress must agree to raise at least $6.5 billion over 10 years to support it, as well as creating some new laws, such as standards to ensure privacy of energy data. Perhaps because the plan, as of today, lacks the power to actually change anything, the telecom industry reaction to it was overwhelmingly positive. But a few dissenters have emerged.

The National Telecommunications Cooperative Association disagreed with the plan's proposal to end rate of return accounting for small telcos, including many of the organization's members. Dan Mitchell, vice president of NTCA's legal and industry division said that although price cap regulation is appropriate for areas that can support multiple communications service providers, he believes the rate of return approach continues to be most appropriate in areas where market conditions do not support competition. The Organization for the Promotion and Advancement of Small Telecommunications Companies expressed concerns about Universal Service reforms. Perhaps feeling snubbed because broadband over power line technology was not highlighted in the plan, another dissenter was International Broadband Electric Communications, a BPL provider.


National Broadband Plan dissenters include small telcos