benton's blog

Analysis

Principles for a Successful IP Transition: Diversity

In addition to ubiquitous availability, Americans must have the ability to access and distribute content that reflects the country’s diversity of viewpoints. Last month, the Benton Foundation released The New Network Compact: Making the IP Transition Work for Vulnerable Communities. The report, written by Ted Gotsch, includes 10 interrelated principles to help policymakers guide the transition from traditional telephone service to emerging broadband networks.

Analysis

Principles for a Successful IP Transition: Accessibility

The 54 million Americans with disabilities, and other vulnerable populations, must be able to make full use of broadband networks and the video and voice services that run over these networks. Last month, the Benton Foundation released The New Network Compact: Making the IP Transition Work for Vulnerable Communities.

Analysis

Principles for a Successful IP Transition: Ubiquity

Every American needs to have affordable access to high-speed fixed and mobile broadband networks. Last month, the Benton Foundation released The New Network Compact: Making the IP Transition Work for Vulnerable Communities. The report, written by Ted Gotsch, includes 10 interrelated principles to help policymakers guide the transition from traditional telephone service to emerging broadband networks.

Analysis

National Broadband Plans: From Vision to Strategy to Execution

National Broadband Plans:
From Vision to Strategy to Execution

Speech As Prepared for Delivery

Thank you for inviting me to share in this important event on the Qatar National Broadband Plan.

We’re here to discuss the choices Qatar should make as to its broadband ecosystem. I thought I’d start by noting how different this is from many other policy debates.

Weekly Digest

Distributing the Future; Which Children Will We Leave Behind?

Distributing the Future;
Which Children Will We Leave Behind?

Blair Levin
Aspen Institute
Communications and Society Fellow

Nevada Broadband Summit
November 18, 2013

Today, I will focus on the biggest issue the FCC will face in how it upgrades the E-Rate program; whether all American school children will soon be able to take advantage of transformative digital education or whether that opportunity will only be available to some, with millions left behind for years, if not decades, to come.

Analysis

Investing in Telecommunications Infrastructure that Will Meet Educational Needs Both Today and Tomorrow

Today, the average American school has about the same bandwidth as the average American home, even though there are 200 times as many people at school as there are at home. Only around 20 percent of our students have access to true high-speed Internet in their classroom and fewer than 20 percent of educators say their school’s Internet connection meets their teaching needs. By comparison, in South Korea 100 percent of students are connected to high-capacity broadband.