Civic Engagement

Why President Obama Took the Lead on High-Speed Internet Access Policy

Location:
Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, 55 5th Ave New York, New York, NY, 10003, United States
Recommendation:
2

President Barack Obama has always talked the talk on network neutrality and broadband access. But now he’s walking the walk. What happened?

New group pushes for municipal broadband in Seattle

Location:
Seattle, WA, United States
Recommendation:
1

A group is once again pushing the city of Seattle (WA) to set up municipal broadband service run by cities and regulated much like water or electricity.

President Obama as Cuba's Internet provider

Location:
The Christian Science Monitor, 210 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, United States
Recommendation:
1

President Obama insists that Cuba’s Castro regime provide open Internet access for its people as a condition for normalizing diplomatic relations.

The first tech moment of the State of the Union happened before President Obama started speaking

Location:
The White House, Washington, 20500, United States
Recommendation:
1

The first tech moment of the State of the Union address came before President Barack Obama had even taken the stage, when the White House released the prepared remarks on blogging platform Medium.

Network Neutrality Supporters Launch 535 Websites to Get Congress on the Record

Location:
US Capitol, East Capitol Street, NE and 1st Street, NE, DC, 20515, United States
Recommendation:
1

Network neutrality advocates launched 535 websites, one for each member of Congress, to identify where the officials stand on the open Internet and generate calls in favor of protections. By visiting BattlefortheNet.com, users can locate their members’ websites and then contact their senators and representatives to urge support for net neutrality.

FCC Announces Tentative Agenda For January 2015 Open Meeting

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler announced that the following items will tentatively be on the agenda for the open meeting scheduled for January 29, 2015 ...

After a long delay, President Obama declines to fire US attorneys over Aaron Swartz’s suicide

Location:
The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20500, United States
Recommendation:
1

The White House is declining to fire two Justice Department officials over their handling of a court case involving Aaron Swartz, an Internet activist who committed suicide in 2013 after being accused of hacking into a university network.

Network neutrality: Is careful empirical analysis losing out to clicktivists and late night pundits?

Location:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI), 1150 Seventeenth Street, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
1

Who has the Federal Communications Commission’s ear? Popular sloganisms and even late night comedic routines appear to rule the world of reactionary clicktivists.

Influencing the Internet from inside and out

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

After decades fighting from the outside, Gigi Sohn has spent the last year and a half as Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler’s special counsel for external affairs. From the inside, Sohn has argued for tough regulations and opened up the organization to new voices and activists. If the FCC adopts tough new rules to reclassify Internet service and treat it like a utility during its meeting next month, Sohn will be at least partly responsible.

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The Biggest FCC Vote Ever

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

We start off the new year with the good news that the Federal Communications will likely vote on net neutrality at its late February meeting. So we might -- just might -- be on the cusp of a decision to reverse the disastrous misclassification of broadband that the FCC made in 2002 for cable modem and a couple of years later for the rest of telecommunications. But good news isn’t done news. I hope no one is sitting back and assuming that just because that 13 year old decision was so dumb, the Commission will surely do the right thing now. Take it from someone who’s been there -- that’s not how the place works. I know five Commissioners who are all that stand in the way of the biggest communications land–grab in history. The legacy and the reputation of the current FCC depend upon what it decides next month. So, too, do our rights as citizens of a democracy that has a lot of work to do and that doesn’t need a hijacked Internet getting in our way.

3 big questions remain as network neutrality heads to the end game

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

Certain wildcards make the final outcome of a Federal Communications Commission February 26 vote on network neutrality hard to predict. Here are three unresolved questions to watch in coming weeks ...

When Internet addiction is actually a good thing

Location:
University of Hong Kong , Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong S.A.R., China
Recommendation:
1

A study from researchers at the University of Hong Kong claims that 420 million people are addicted to the Internet, about 6 percent of the world’s population. That 6 percent number may not sound high but it is -- it’s actually more than three times the rates of pathological gambling observed in even the most gambling-obsessed nations around the world.

Can the Internet Defeat Putin?

Location:
Russian Federation, Russia
Recommendation:
2

Aleksei Navalny presents a new kind of threat to the Putin regime. He was the first Russian activist to have used the Internet as an effective tool of political resistance.

Amid protests, social media's role is praised and scrutinized

Location:
USA, United States
Recommendation:
1

Protests around the country following the police killings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and others have been amplified by the use and ubiquity of social media.

Setting the Record Straight on Open Internet Comments

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
3

Some key takeaways from the Federal Communications Commission inquiry into Open Internet comments ...

White House Promotes Title II Via Social Media

Location:
The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20500, United States
Recommendation:
1

The White House is featuring network neutrality prominently on its home page, including the video President Barack Obama made promoting Title II, the same plan expanded upon in a statement on virtual White House letterhead, and a request to spread the word via social media.

Clearing up the confusion about Sunlight’s analysis of network neutrality comments to the FCC

Location:
Sunlight Foundation, 1818 N Street NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States
Recommendation:
2

Our commitment to transparency, to open data and to the informed use of that data prompted us to do this follow up to address some of the concerns and reaction to Sunlight's latest analysis of public comments on the Federal Communications Commission's proposal to regulate Internet traffic ...

Why it doesn't matter if network neutrality opponents "won" the FCC comment war

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

The vast majority of network neutrality comments -- Sunlight says 88 percent in the latest batch -- were form letters created with help from a handful of activist groups on either side of the fight. So the ratio of pro- and anti-network neutrality comments may tell us less about what voters think than about how well-funded each side's activist groups are.

Google gearing up for 2015 NSA fight

Location:
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA, 94043, United States
Recommendation:
1

Google is already gearing up for 2015's fight over the National Security Agency.

One group dominates the second round of network neutrality comments

Location:
Sunlight Foundation, 1818 N Street NW, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

A letter-writing campaign that appears to have been organized by an organization with ties to the Koch Brothers inundated the Federal Communications Commission with missives opposed to network neutrality, an analysis by the Sunlight Foundation reveals.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Accommodates Title II Protestors

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
1

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler accommodated protesters who initially interrupted the FCC's December public meeting to call for Title II reclassification of Internet access.

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A Book for Now

Location:
Annenberg School for Communication - University of Pennsylvania, 3620 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States
Recommendation:
2

It's decision time regarding the Internet. Will the dynamic and opportunity-creating technology of the Internet be put on the same downhill road of radio, TV, and cable? Or will we learn from the mistakes of our past, and choose a higher road? There is a great new book, just published, that I hope Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler and his colleagues will read before they vote on “network neutrality” early in 2015. The book is America’s Battle for Media Democracy: The Triumph of Corporate Libertarianism and the Future of Media Reform. Victor Pickard, one of the brightest young media scholars in the communications firmament, is its author.

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A Book for Now

There is a great new book, just published, that I hope Chairman Tom Wheeler and his FCC colleagues will read before they vote on “net neutrality” early in the new year. The book is America’s Battle for Media Democracy: The Triumph of Corporate Libertarianism and the Future of Media Reform. Victor Pickard, one of the brightest young media scholars in the communications firmament, is its author. He has mined a veritable mountain of records to compile an eye-opening story of the ups and downs (mostly downs) of the ongoing battle between media gatekeepers and public interest reformers. This is usable history—the best kind of history—showing that we have been at communications inflection points like this before and documenting what happens when we allow ourselves to get suckered down the wrong road. The wrong road is the one too often taken, Pickard shows, in spite of reformers and, occasionally, even a heroic FCC.

Social Media Help Fuel Protests After New York Officer Not Indicted Over Death of Eric Garner

Location:
New York, NY, United States
Recommendation:
2

Soon after a grand jury decided not to indict a white New York City police officer in the death of a black man, Twitter and Facebook lighted up with thousands of messages organized around hashtags such as #EricGarner, #ICantBreathe and #BlackLivesMatter.

Activating Citizens: Organizing for Change in the Digital Era

Dec 10 2014 - 9:30am - 11:00am
Location:
New America Foundation (NAF), 1899 L St NW, 4th Floor, Washington, DC, 20036, United States

Join us December 10th for a multi-faceted discussion on civic organization and mobilization featuring leading experts with diverse backgrounds. They will discuss recommended models to help associations build the power they want to support a healthy democracy and structure the capacity they need to inspire action.

President Obama on Ferguson Decision: ‘The Media is Going to Have a Responsibility As Well’

Location:
The White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20500, United States
Recommendation:
2

After the decision by a Missouri grand jury not to issue an indictment against a Ferguson police officer in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown, President Barack Obama called on news media to be sure to balance coverage of potential violence with more positive responses to the questions spurred by the Brown case.

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The Internet's Future is Now

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
2

So 2014 will pass into history without the Federal Communications Commission stepping up to the plate to ensure an Open Internet. Think of the good history the Commission could have made for itself. Instead we got more delay and more uncertainty about whether Title II net neutrality will ever see the light of day. The hoped-for scenario now is that progress will come at the January 2015 FCC monthly meeting. Perhaps, even as you read this, the Commission is reworking its notably deficient and wildly unpopular proposal from earlier this year. There is no reason for this process -- if indeed this is the process now -- to take long. The agency is expert on every aspect of telecommunication law; it has been amassing a comprehensive Title I/Title II/Section 706 record for more than a dozen years; and there are no new arguments to be made that haven’t been made many times before. Time is not the friend of the Open Internet.

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The Internet's Future is Now

So 2014 will pass into history without the Federal Communications Commission stepping up to the plate to ensure an Open Internet. Think of the good history the Commission could have made for itself. Instead we got more delay and more uncertainty about whether Title II net neutrality will ever see the light of day.

The President Might Have Just Saved the Internet

Location:
Free Press (DC), 501 Third Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001, United States
Recommendation:
2

I haven't been shy about criticizing this administration in the past -- and I won't hesitate to do so in the future. But today, Internet users everywhere should thank President Obama and his staff. Today, they just might have saved the Internet.

Protesters descend on FCC chairman’s house over network neutrality

Location:
Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC, 20554, United States
Recommendation:
1

Internet activists descended on Federal Communications Commission Tom Wheeler's house as he was trying to back out of his driveway on Nov 10. The 6-foot-4 chairman drives a Mini Cooper, but even that nimble vehicle wouldn't have been able to get around the human blockade.

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