Benton Foundation

Can Online Public Files Combat the Flood of Money in Elections?

[Commentary] This week the New York Times reported on an explosion of spending on political advertising on television.

What’s in the E-rate Order? A Streamlined Process

The third major goal adopted by the Federal Communications Commission in the latest E-rate reform proceeding is to make the E-rate application process (and other E-rate processes) fast, simple and efficient.

What’s in the E-rate Order? Maximizing E-rate Dollars

[Commentary] Maximizing the benefit of each dollar spent on telecommunications services for schools and libraries and minimizing the contribution burden on consumers and businesses is a major goal adopted by the Federal Communications Commission i

Paid Peering, Paid Prioritization, and the Nuance of the Net Neutrality Debate

[Commentary] It is easy to conflate peering and paid prioritization. Recently, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Rep. Doris Matsui (D-CT) introduced bills in both chambers of Congress to ban so-called paid prioritization.

What's in the E-rate Order? Affordable High-Speed Broadband To and Within Schools and Libraries

In this the first of a series of articles looking at the order, we examine the Federal Communications Commission’s efforts to bring Internet connectivity both to the building and to devices within schools and libraries.

Cities Seek FCC Help to Expand Broadband

[Commentary] Chattanooga (TN) and Wilson (NC) simultaneously petitioned the FCC to pre-empt laws in their states that ban the cities from expanding their high-speed Internet networks.

The Legal Underpinnings of The Prison Phone Call Debate

You may well have read about the Federal Communications Commission’s vote last August to cap rates for interstate phone calls placed by prison inmates.

It's Not About "Can We?" It's About "Will We?"

[Commentary] Public comments are due regarding the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC) proposed rules for network neutrality.

Privacy, Civil Liberties and the NSA

[Commentary] On July 2, the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board released a detailed analysis of U.S. surveillance programs.

Two Decisions Shed Light on the Supreme Court's Role in Telecommunications Policy

[Commentary] The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) released two big communications-related decisions on June 25. First, the Court unanimously ruled that the police need warrants to search the cellphones of people they arrest.