Local firms that rely on film industry fight to keep jobs in Los Angeles

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On March 15, more than 600 other businesses, industry groups, politicians and community members rallied to support legislation that would extend and expand California's film and TV tax credit, which is due to expire in 2017.

The rally was organized by the California Film & Television Production Alliance at Independent Studio Services, a prop house in Sunland.

"We have the best weather and the best locations and it doesn't matter," Steve Michelson, owner of Los Angeles-based film production catering company Limelight Catering, said. "Even if a show or movie is supposed to be based in Los Angeles, they go to other states because they are getting offered bigger incentives."

Catering companies, like dry cleaners, prop houses and many other businesses that rely on production companies for the bulk of their revenue have been forced to relocate to other states, slash payrolls, file for bankruptcy or close because of the lack of jobs in California. The film industry tax incentive bill was written by Assemblymen Raul Bocanegra (D-Pacoima) and Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles), who were among the local politicians who spoke at the rally.


Local firms that rely on film industry fight to keep jobs in Los Angeles