Here are the five officials who will decide the controversial changes to net neutrality rules

Here are the five commissioners who will decide the latest round of the net neutrality battle at the Federal Communications Commission’s Dec. 14 meeting.

  1. Ajit Pai: a telecommunications lawyer who has served on the FCC since 2012. The son of immigrants from India, he was associate general counsel of Verizon Communications Inc. from 2001 to 2003 before working as a staffer at the U.S. Senate, the Justice Department and the FCC.
  2. Michael O'Rielly: a Republican and former congressional staffer who has been an FCC commissioner since 2013. He worked in the House and Senate, rising to policy advisor for Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX), a member of the Republican’s leadership team, before being nominated for the FCC seat.
  3. Brendan Carr: the newest Republican on the commission, but he’s not new to the FCC. Carr, a telecommunications attorney, had spent three years as Pai’s legal advisor for wireless, public safety and international issues. Pai then chose Carr to be the FCC’s general counsel in January. President Trump nominated him for a commission seat in June and he took office in August. Before joining the FCC, Carr worked as a telecommunications attorney at the Wiley Rein law firm, where his clients included AT&T Inc., Verizon and USTelecom, a broadband industry trade group. He’s an ally of Pai and said Tuesday he “fully supported” the chairman’s proposal to return to the pre-2015 regulatory framework.
  4. Mignon Clyburn: the longest-serving member of the FCC. A former member of the Public Service Commission of South Carolina, Clyburn joined the FCC in 2009. She served as acting chairwoman of the FCC for about six months in 2013. She is a strong supporter of the tough net neutrality rules and joined with former Chairman Tom Wheeler and Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel — all Democrats — to approve them in 2015.
  5. Jessica Rosenworcel: returned to the commission in August after political complications in the Senate led to her first term expiring in January 2017. A former FCC staffer and then senior communications counsel for the Senate Commerce committee, Rosenworcel first became a commissioner in 2012. Trump nominated her in June to fill a Democratic seat. She was sworn in Aug. 11, the same day as Carr.

Here are the five officials who will decide the controversial changes to net neutrality rules