Nitasha Tiku

Are Google and Facebook Undermining Europe's Privacy Rules?

Less than a month before tough new European privacy rules take effect, there are growing concerns from regulators, publishers, and privacy watchdogs about the ways that two internet giants—Google and Facebook—plan to implement the regulations. The

Why Facebook's Troubles Haven't Dented Its Profits

In response to the Cambridge Analytica story, Facebook has curbed outsiders’ access to its data, vowed to hire thousands of additional content reviewers, and offered users clearer privacy controls. “I don’t think they do anything that will cost th

How a Controversial New Sex-Trafficking Law Will Change The Web

Opponents fear that the Stop Enabling Online Sex Trafficking Act messes with a key ground rule that has allowed the internet to flourish. “Section 230 we’ve been saying for a long time is responsible for creating the modern internet that we know a

How Europe's New Privacy Law Will Change the Web, and More

Consumers have long wondered just what Google and Facebook know about them, and who else can access their personal data.

Rep Cicilline (D-RI) Bill Would Let Publishers Gang Up Versus Facebook and Google

Rep David Cicilline (D-RI) plans to introduce a bill that would exempt publishers from antitrust enforcement so they can negotiate collectively over terms for distributing their content.

How to Curb Silicon Valley Power -- Even With Weak Antitrust Laws

Technology companies with unprecedented power to sway consumers and move markets have done the unthinkable: They’ve made trust-busting sound like a good idea again.

Facebook's New Captcha Test: 'Upload a Clear Photo of Your Face'

Facebook may soon ask you to "upload a photo of yourself that clearly shows your face," to prove you're not a bot. The company is using a new kind of captcha to verify whether a user is a real person.

State Attorneys General Are Google's Next Headache

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley said he is investigating whether Google violated Missouri’s consumer-protection and antitrust laws. In one respect, Hawley’s investigation is “one AG in one state,” says Bradley Tusk, a political fixer for Sil